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Green Energy Living

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hello, can anyone recommend a solar hot water pump that would be strong enough to take water 12 ft up and circulate through two 4 by 8 ft solar panels? but it would have to have a slow enough water flow to heat up the water in the panels before it returns. and also a solar photovoltaic panel to run the pump?. Thank you.

stmbtwle

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Reply with quote  #2 
There are lots of them on ebay and amazon, just check the specs. "Brushless" pumps have no brushes or seals to wear out and work well. Most are submersible, but do NOT submerge them. The motor needs cooling and may fail from the heat if submerged in hot water. Been there.

12v panels can produce up to 22v and may burn out a 12v pump if connected directly. A "buck converter" will regulate the voltage to a safe level. Some are adjustable. You could use a 24v pump, but it might not develop the lift you need at the lower voltages. Again, check the specs. Try to find a pump that will take 24v but still give you the lift you want at 12v.

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Green Energy Living

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Reply with quote  #3 
That's good information to know especially about the controller, I'll definitely get one of those. Thank you for your response, good information
sundug

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Reply with quote  #4 
Quote:
Originally Posted by stmbtwle
There are lots of them on ebay and amazon, just check the specs. "Brushless" pumps have no brushes or seals to wear out and work well. Most are submersible, but do NOT submerge them. The motor needs cooling and may fail from the heat if submerged in hot water. Been there.

12v panels can produce up to 22v and may burn out a 12v pump if connected directly. A "buck converter" will regulate the voltage to a safe level. Some are adjustable. You could use a 24v pump, but it might not develop the lift you need at the lower voltages. Again, check the specs. Try to find a pump that will take 24v but still give you the lift you want at 12v.

==========================================================
I have been running a 10 watt panel directly wired to a circulation pump for 29 years with no problem- 
http://www.builditsolar.com/Projects/WaterHeating/DougsSolarWater.htm

And a 20 watt panel on my hot tub solar water heater-  https://simplysolar.supporttopics.com/post/new-evacuated-tube-spa-swh-7477891?highlight=spa+hot+tub&pid=1304990455

f
or 5 years with no problem.  I helped a friend set up PV direct to pump for his household water supply, been working fine for 20 years. I see no need  of a buck converter. Just having the load wired to the panel will keep voltages down. Doug

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stmbtwle

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Reply with quote  #5 
In most cases that's true, but I HAVE burned out a couple pumps and an Arduino using a 60w panel (it's what I had). A 10w panel would probably be safe, but does it have enough power to lift the required 12'? I don't know.

I look at the converter as a safety device, they're not that expensive.

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sundug

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Reply with quote  #6 
I think a Linear Current Booster is a better idea. We used one on my friends PV direct water pump.

https://www.altestore.com/store/solar-water-pumps/linear-current-boosters-for-solar-pumps-c581/

Linear current boosters are used for optimizing the power out of your solar panels to get your Solar Water Pumps turning as early and as late as possible into the day. Linear Currenct Boosters (LCB) are for solar water pumps and solar panels what a car's transmission is used for getting its wheels turning as the engine ramps up power.

In theory, many solar pumps can be powered directly from the right voltage solar panel array. However, in reality, without the linear current booster the pumps works significantly less through out the day. The LCB increases the current (to get the pump's motor moving) at the sacrifice of voltage when your panels are not getting full direct sunlight.

Linear current boosters are rated by the maximum amperage (current) that they can put out. You'll want this maximum amps to be as much or more than the maximum draw of the solar pump. LCBs inherently work at different input and output voltages as part of their optimization.


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stmbtwle

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Reply with quote  #7 
Sounds to me like they may be different names for the same thing. A buck driver (as I understand) converts the excess voltage to current, so it would "boost" the current while lowering the voltage. I suspect an MPPT charge controller uses the same technology.

https://electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/151600/differences-between-buck-converter-and-linear-current-booster

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sundug

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Reply with quote  #8 
I never heard of a buck driver, so I searched it- "

Step-Down (Buck) LED Drivers | Analog Devices

http://www.analog.com/en/products/power-management/led-driver-ic/step-down-buck-led-drivers.html" href="https://duckduckgo.com/?q=buck%20driver+site:www.analog.com" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">[com]http://www.analog.com/en/products/power-management/led-driver-ic/step-down-buck-led-drivers.html
" data-src="//external-content.duckduckgo.com/ip3/www.analog.com.ico">https://www.analog.com
/en/products/power-management/led-driver-ic/step-down-buck-led-drivers.html
Analog Devices step-down (buck) LED drivers are ideal for applications where the input voltage is above the LED voltage, as in many automotive or industrial applications. These LED drivers offer the highest efficiency, lowest noise, and the smallest footprints.

Sounds like they are different devices. Doug

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stmbtwle

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Reply with quote  #9 
I never heard of the buck driver until a couple years ago when it was mentioned on here, and never heard of the current booster until you mentioned it, so I'm not an expert on either one. I do know the buck driver makes a good voltage control and they're common on ebay. Which one is better I don't know.
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sundug

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Reply with quote  #10 
Google says buck driver is for LEDs, LCB is for motors.
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