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goodgoat

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Reply with quote  #1 
Has there been any testing using treated pine for framing material as far as air quality entering a home? Would it be better to use untreated pine and apply clear deck sealer or epoxy and UV spar varnish to the outside only?

Bert

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Reply with quote  #2 
I wouldn't use treated wood. Personally I would use cedar for the outside and maybe poplar for the inside.
Cedar holds up well to the weather and bugs (usually) and poplar supposively offgas the least.

Most people do use pine or metal I believe. They usually paint the outside to match their homes. They may paint the inside with a high temperature black paint, depending on what they build.

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Bert K.
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Garage_Hermit

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Reply with quote  #3 
Regarding the hi-temp black paint, the stuff I bought says that it does not work right until is has been exposed (once) to a temperature of 150°C - that is 300°F...

Since there is no way my collector would get that hi, I think I'll just resort to ordinary matt-black paint, and save 20% on the price...

G_H

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gbwillson

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Reply with quote  #4 
Welcome goodgoat!

Untreated lumber should be fine as long as it is protected with paint or urethane. Think about all of the trim on the exterior of your house and how long it lasts. I have been looking for an alternative to using wood and last year built a collector out of steel stud channels. It worked very well, but with a few issues. I've also explored using HDPE as a building material. You can buy this in 4x8 sheets and different thicknesses. The biggest problem using HDPE is that it is quite difficult to glue anything to it, including silicone. 

Greg in MN


solarexcel

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Reply with quote  #5 
Treated or untreated wood? To avoid outgassing I would use untreated wood and apply a non-toxic sealant like Lumber Seal which claims to be "VOC free and Non Toxic Eco Coating."

Quote:
"Regarding the hi-temp black paint, the stuff I bought says that it does not work right until is has been exposed (once) to a temperature of 150°C - that is 300°F..."

Simply use a heat gun (or maybe even a powerful hair dryer) to get that curing temperature.

Quote:
"The biggest problem using HDPE is that it is quite difficult to glue anything to it, including silicone."

My guess is that the glue adherence challenge is simply that it is a smooth surface and scuffing/roughing the surface will solve this problem.
gbwillson

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Reply with quote  #6 
Welcome solarexcel!

Having spent a bit of time researching and experimenting with HDPE, I can say that no amount of scuffing will allow any commonly found adhesive to bond two pieces. I played around with changing the molecular structure of the HDPE surface using an electrostatic charge. This method is used industrially, but in addition to the application of industrial adhesives. I did have success at making silicone stick "better", but nothing close to a secure bond. You could drill holes through the HDPE and allow the adhesive to fill these holes, but then it becomes a mechanical bond, not a chemical one. You would be better off using nuts and bolts. 

A hairdryer or heat gun is a good idea, although time consuming. I think there are hi-temp paints on the market that do not need high temps to cure.

Greg in MN
solarexcel

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Reply with quote  #7 

Thanks for the welcome gbwillson!

RE: "Having spent a bit of time researching and experimenting with HDPE, I can say that no amount of scuffing will allow any commonly found adhesive to bond two pieces."
I just spent a few seconds doing a Google search and immediately found this video.
Looks like there is no need for scuffing! 

How to Bond HDPE, UHMW or Polypropylene Sheet



and 

How to repair and glue Polyethylene and Seaboard

gbwillson

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Reply with quote  #8 
Yes, there are several adhesives such as the ppx5 and 3M DP8005 available, however the cost of these are quite expensive($130+) and the strength is only a fraction of a good epoxy. Additionally, many adhesive have a low suggested working temp which could cause the joint to fail. These may work fine for smaller projects or at joints with less stress, but the weight of a large collector could cause bonds to fail. Still, if the collector can be permanently installed without bond failure this could be an option if the cost isn't an issue. 

Greg in MN
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