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Ilya

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Posts: 4
Reply with quote  #1 
Dear forum participants, at the moment I am studying the pros and cons of solar panels installed on the roof of a private house in the context of developing a new product for this market. There is a need to talk with homeowners mainly in Europe about your experience in choosing, installing and using solar panels. The meeting will take 10-15 minutes. Convenient via Skype, but ready to consider other options. Contacts how to contact you can be left here or send a message to Skype user "Fkesh66". I hope for your help and assistance.

DIYsolarGuy

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Posts: 21
Reply with quote  #2 
Not really interested in any Skype meeting but I will tell you why I do not like the idea of putting solar panels on the roof of my home. IMO, doing so will shorten the life of your roof. If it was done at the same time as the roof's construction, that could make a difference but from my experience with roofs, any time you install anything that deverts water, over time it will start leaking in that location.
I just heard this week that they are passing a law in CAL, that requires all new homes, of a certain size, be built with Solar panel. 
solarozq

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Posts: 16
Reply with quote  #3 
If you are in a hot climate solar panels will shade your roof so your house will be cooler. The roof space is in shadow so the roof space is cooler. The more panels the bigger the effect. Properly installed panel should have no bad effects.
stmbtwle

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Reply with quote  #4 
In theory yes, but I'm not so sure that is the case.  Generally roof-mounted arrays are only a few inches above the roof, and tend to trap hot air between the panels and the roof.  If there were a space of a foot or so to allow cooling it would be different, but I've never seen such an installation.
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Solar is like the wind. It may be free, but putting it to work isn't!
Willie, Tampa Bay
Ilya

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Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DIYsolarGuy
Not really interested in any Skype meeting but I will tell you why I do not like the idea of putting solar panels on the roof of my home. IMO, doing so will shorten the life of your roof. If it was done at the same time as the roof's construction, that could make a difference but from my experience with roofs, any time you install anything that deverts water, over time it will start leaking in that location.
I just heard this week that they are passing a law in CAL, that requires all new homes, of a certain size, be built with Solar panel. 


May be this problem can decide the changing the type of installation?
Ilya

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Posts: 4
Reply with quote  #6 
DIYsolarGuy You really have a problem with water leakage? I saw on your photo the type of installation and I think the decision to change the type of installation

solarozq You said "Properly installed". If I understand right there may be difficulties in the installation process?

stmbtwle Do I understand correctly that the delay in hot air affects the heating of the roof itself and solar panels?

Dear participants, what you can say about the roof imaging after installing the panels? Initially, after all, choosing not only the type of roof, but also how it will look?
DIYsolarGuy

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Posts: 21
Reply with quote  #7 
I totally agree with you stmbtwle, solar panels generate a lot of heat, so the amount of shade you get from them would be of little value, when the heat is that much higher. When I was researching info about my install, I read that when you install solar panels on a house, you need at a minimum 5" clearance between the panel and the roof. I got by with less clearance by not installing my panels on a shingled roof. My reasoning was that a shingled roof traps the heat between the solar panels and the shingles but a thin metal roof allows at least some of the heat to dissipate. I guess I will find out next Summer. 
 
Ilya

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Reply with quote  #8 

DIYsolarGuy Why you think that thin metal roof allows at least some of the heat to dissipate?

stmbtwle

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Reply with quote  #9 
"stmbtwle Do I understand correctly that the delay in hot air affects the heating of the roof itself and solar panels?"

My feeling is that a large air gap would allow any breeze or convection to carry away the hot air from the panels, and help cool the roof.  A narrow gap will not.  I measured the temperature of the roof under my panels some years ago and it was hotter than expected, though I don't remember if the temperature was higher or lower than the unshaded portion.  Of course the color of the roof would make a difference, too.

Also some years I tried fan-cooling a small PV panel.  Though it did reduce the temperature of the panel and increased the output, the fan consumed most of the gain.  I didn't pursue the idea any further.



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Solar is like the wind. It may be free, but putting it to work isn't!
Willie, Tampa Bay
DIYsolarGuy

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Reply with quote  #10 
I don't have a problem with water leakage, what I said is that I have seen problems when water is diverted.  There are many things that divert water on roofs, from a chimney to a swamp cooler inlet box but the mounts that support Solar panels are what we are talking about in this case. There is less chance of a problem when mounts are installed at the time of a roof is being constructed but anytime a roof is modified, like when solar panels are installed, there is little doubt it will shorten the life of that roof. Even with the best sealant, that is used to cover the modified area, it will crack over time and water will get in. This could take ten years or longer but once the water gets in, the roof will leak. In areas of less rain or snow this problem will take even longer to be noticed.
The reason i feel that a thin metal roof allows at least some of the heat to dissipate, is because there is less resistance to blocking the heat. Heat can be absorbed by a thin metal roof, like where I installed my solars array but not so with other roofing material, like shingles. 

Not really sure what you are asking with your statement,"what you can say about the roof imaging after installing the panels?" Are you asking what I think about how a roof looks after solar panels are installed? If so, all I can say is, it is what it is, there really is nothing to say. Unless you are somehow thinking that you can make them more appealing.
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