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ernieriddle

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Reply with quote  #31 
I have looked at ref and came up with 358kwh per year as far as the dehumidifier they don't seem to put the same tags on so not sure. I will be using the smallest that will give me options for hose drain as well as timmer> I can set it to only run during the day. I do want to make sure I am covered for extra lights etc.. but definatly want to keep costs down.

stmbtwle

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Reply with quote  #32 
358 seems about right for a small fridge. As to the dehumidifier, there's probably no way of knowing ahead of time. If you can get to the back of it you should find a watts or amps rating. But as it likely cycles, that's not much use either. I would do it in steps:

1. Buy the fridge, dehumifier and install it, along with appropriate wiring.

2. Run it on your generator with the 'kill a watt' till you get a reasonable estimate of consumption. Add at least 50%.

3. Buy your inverter,charger, and enough batteries for at least 24 hours (48 or 72 hrs is better). Plug your meter into the inverter. A volt-ammeter to monitor battery condition would be good too, they're cheap.

4. Run it like this for a few weeks, charging the batteries daily with the generator and charger. You may decide this is as far as you need to go.

5. When the weather warms up get your controller (oversize it) and solar panels, and install them.

6. You can add more panels or batteries later if you decide you need them. It's easier and less intimidating this way.

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Solar is like the wind. It may be free, but putting it to work isn't!
Willie, Tampa Bay
Gordy

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Reply with quote  #33 
I would add a cautionary note to what Willie said. If you need to add batteries do it as soon as possible. The older batteries will have reduced capacity from use, and will drag new batteries down to the older batteries level. So the sooner you get the new batteries the better.

Gordy

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Gordy,
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Rick H Parker

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Reply with quote  #34 
The energy consumption of 358kwh per year will come in handy later. The next step is to determine your peak power requirements so we can size the inverter.

What refrigerator and dehumidifier did you decide on?

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Rick H Parker
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stmbtwle

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Reply with quote  #35 
The PEAK should be marked on the back of the equipment. Add all of them up and you need an inverter with a surge capacity of a little more.   The fridge is maybe 600-700w, which corresponds to the starting load.  Running, probably around 100-150.  Average for the day, maybe 50-75, depending on how much you open the door. This is from my fridge, which has about the same power consumption. 
However this is why you need a meter.  Cycling loads are all over the place,  from the peak starting load all the way down to 0.  Without a meter of some sort you're just guessing.

A 1000w inverter will run the fridge easily, but with the other equipment you want something bigger.

A note on inverters.  Every inverter has an "idle" power consumption, which it uses even when there's nothing running; the bigger the inverter the bigger the consumption.   

Some inverters have as sensor which shuts the inverter off, leaving only the sensor on.  The minute you turn something on (like the light in the fridge) the sensor sees that and turns the inverter on for you.  This can save you power in the long run.  However I'm told that electronic equipment (like a tv) even when off draw just enough to fool the sensor into turning the inverter on all the time. 

Also some inverters (and all inverter-chargers) have an automatic switch which will switch between the batteries and the generator. It will save you having to install a changeover switch, and switching manually.  

All these extra bells and whistles add to the price, of course. You have to decide whether you need them or not.




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Solar is like the wind. It may be free, but putting it to work isn't!
Willie, Tampa Bay
Rick H Parker

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Reply with quote  #36 
US 120V outlets are 15 or 20A. The electrical code limits the amount of current a appliance can draw to 80%.

120V * 15A * 0.80 = 1440W.
120V * 20A * 0.80 = 1920W.
We can safely say the startup current is not greater then 1920 Watts.
An appliance manufacturer would want to design for a 15A socket so that there would not be compatibility problems. 1440W max is a reasonable assumption.
If he puts all three on a 3000W inverter, it might trip once in a blue moon, when the inverter is loaded with lights .. ect, then both the refrigerator and AC try to start up at the same time. 


A 1000k inverter will run the fridge easily, but with the other equipment you want something bigger.


[wave] A Megawatt would run a small village.



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Rick H Parker
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stmbtwle

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Reply with quote  #37 
Typo, fixed. Thanks. 

Can't recommend trying to run an AC on an inverter.
You can do it, but it will be expensive.  Do the math.

https://www.homedepot.com/catalog/pdfImages/3e/3e383d92-8957-4ae8-82a3-30d5b1b3a319.pdf


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Solar is like the wind. It may be free, but putting it to work isn't!
Willie, Tampa Bay
Rick H Parker

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Reply with quote  #38 
Can't recommend trying to run an AC on an inverter.
You can do it, but it will be expensive.  Do the math.


Hybrid Inverter interfaced with his generator .....

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Rick H Parker
Kansas, USA
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stmbtwle

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Reply with quote  #39 
Yes but the inverter is not carrying the load, the generator is.
Simpler (and cheaper) to just plug it into the generator directly.

The problem isn't the inverter, it's the BATTERIES (and charging them).

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Solar is like the wind. It may be free, but putting it to work isn't!
Willie, Tampa Bay
Rick H Parker

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Reply with quote  #40 
Yes but the inverter is not carrying the load, the generator is.

Some of then can cogenerate, ... share the load.

Some have load load diverters that will turn off one circuit if there is a huge power demand on the other circuit.


The problem isn't the inverter, it's the BATTERIES (and charging them).

That is where cogeneration comes in. He will have two electrical energy sources. The correct Hybrid inverter can make use of both. Some have a feature that can turn on the generator if the batteries or the PV panels cannot keep up.


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Rick H Parker
Kansas, USA
Electronics Engineering Technologist
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