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Bert

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Reply with quote  #31 
Oh. Yeah I didn't understand. That probably would work good also. This is in the crawlspace that is nearly impossible to get to, so I would had to put it back closer to the furnace.
The vent fan is working out good though. I am surprised.

The fans should be easy to upgrade. Probably could make a DIY register fan if I could find a good schematic. 

BTW. that on/off cycling has stopped now that I exchange the transformer with my 12v dc supply.



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Bert K.
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Garage_Hermit

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Reply with quote  #32 
Quote:
The south side windows are about 32 sq ft total in the family room. Then there's one small window in the bathroom and another in the garage.

The family room is about 360 sq ft.

There are three other windows in the family room not on the south side.
Double pane windows.


Hi Bert, No I did not forget you !

I thought so - you are around 9 percent.

I found this link...
http://www.mnshi.umn.edu/kb/scale/windowsa_o.html
In general, a window-to-floor area ratio close to 15% is recommended for conventional construction. This window-to-floor area ratio balances energy, first cost, and indoor environmental quality. Houses implementing passive solar strategies using thermal mass and south orientation must be evaluated on an individual basis and may require a different overall window-to-floor area ratio to achieve maximum benefit. If significantly more window area is desirable, large expanses of west and east-facing glass should be avoided. To some extent, high performance windows (such as triple-glazed low-E options) can reduce the energy penalty for higher window-to-floor area ratios. In addition, high-performance windows like triple-glazed windows may be desirable where large expanses of glass are used. Otherwise, cold drafts and cold surface temperatures can make adjacent spaces uncomfortably cold.

(Just to give you something to think about for when you win the Lotto [smile])

Maybe take some temperature tests in front of and around the windows, and see if there's any leakage...  Then one day when you are feeling adventurous, you could maybe sneak off some trim and get a screwdriver into the wall to see how they are insulated... From experience, a can of PU foam can do wonders on windows...).

I like your new dual fan !
Since it is out of sight in the CS (?) I guess you are probably not too much bothered about the appearance of it, so you could maybe try adding a downstream duct on it -- even just carboard taped around: would probably increase the performance quite a bit more even... maybe start with something that is about 2 foot long, then experiment. Coroplast would be better...

G_H

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Bert

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Reply with quote  #33 
GH,
Interesting about the windows. That could mean adding more solar collectors are important as well. They will collect the heat and they help insulate the wall.
There is insulation in the walls, but not sure how well done it is.
I don't notice any leaks by the window, but I have one door that is warp. May have to get creative with weather stripping until Spring comes.

That fan just sits in the register vent. It's hidden behind my computer desk.



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Bert K.
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Bert

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Reply with quote  #34 
I'm trying to settle on one of these three ideas.

1.  ORIG.jpg

2. OPTION2.jpg 
3.  OPTION-3.jpg 
The 1st one has the most sq. ft. but that large center collector may look out of place and I'm not sure how the airflow would be.
The second one is OK. 

I'm leaning a bit toward the third option, which Greg suggested. It would only be 9 sq. ft. less than option 1.
I would have to remove my small collector and repair the outside and inside walls. ( where the two black dots are. 8" diameter each.)

I think it would look the best and the center or actually the right  collector would have better airflow. Since it's too hard to have an air duct on the right, was thinking of a ZPDP for that collector. Both intake and out take would be on the left where it's easier to install.

What do you think?



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Bert K.
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gbwillson

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Reply with quote  #35 
Bert-

Aesthetically, I like #3 because if trimmed the right way, it could look like it was part of the design of the house, instead of something that was placed in front of the house. Annual flowers and plants could hide or block them from view if needed. It may not be an issue, but depending on where you live and your neighbors, the lower designs are less noticeable.  

The like design #3 for a ZP-type heater. But a ZPDP, especially on the 26' collector, may present a problem. My 16' ZP builds up a lot of heat over 16' and you would be adding not only 50% more length to a standard ZP, but then double back. That turn around will be not only a bottle neck for heat, but airflow as well. My finished ZPDP may give some clue as to how to best handle the turn around when finished, but mine is only 4'x8', so yours will produce a LOT more heat. My suggestion would be to build the ZP for the garage to see just how much heat you generate over the 20'. And then you can decide which direction to go with the 4'x26' heater.

The ZP has low flow resistance already, so I'm wondering if could use the existing holes routed from either end into the house? The duct runs would be long, but with enough fan power and proper duct runs it may work. You could use 8" ducts if needed.

Greg in MN


Bert

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Reply with quote  #36 
Greg,
The holes are at the top of the wall, so I rather not use them for looks.
May have to go the ZP route then as you suggest. I could go through the block on the right side into the craw space. Even if I can't reach  inside it may work. Just have the duct go in a foot or two.
I could then have the output go in the other side of the crawl space and bring the duct work farther in. 
Hopefully that would still heat the house up some.

The wife is getting concerned about the looks, so keeping it low will help. Also a ZP would be less depth. 
It's approaching the shortest day of the year in a couple weeks and I'm getting about 5 hours each sunny day. Would be more if not for the trees on the East side.

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Bert K.
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Garage_Hermit

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Reply with quote  #37 
Bert, is your crawlspace "clean" (conditioned) ?

If not, I'd be careful about what I was dragging into the house...
Not just radon - lots of other soil gases; damp; mold spores; you name it...

The way round it is an unbroken duct *through* the CS, like I said before somewhere...

G_H

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Bert

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Reply with quote  #38 
GH
Good advice. The area where I can get into is clean with a concrete floor. I have to investigate the other part. If it isn't, then I will have to run ductwork 25 to 30 feet somehow.
I may have to think of alternative plans just in case.
That's why I'm thinking about a ZPDP in case I can't do a straight run.


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Bert K.
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gbwillson

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Reply with quote  #39 
Bert-

Why do the ducts need to go through the foundation? Why can't the ducts enter and exit through the siding like the previous access points? Or at least enter through the foundation, into the crawlspace and immediately turn up into the living space.


Greg in MN
Bert

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Reply with quote  #40 
I'm trying not to cut any more holes in the wall then needed. The existing holes are at the top of the wall and too far away for a horizontal collector.
I have thought of going through the floor if needed, but that may be hard to do.
Another thing is that all the heat would go in the family room if I came through the wall or floor. It already gets too hot from my tiny collector on sunny days.
I thought the crawl space or the basement would even out the heat across the house more.

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Bert K.
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