Welcome to the Solar Collector
Brainstorming and Development Page!


 

Home

Hot Air Collector

Hot Water Project 1

Hot Water & Space Heating

Solar Electric

Solar Construction 101

FAQs

Best Collectors

Simply Solar
Sign up Calendar Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 1 of 8      1   2   3   4   Next   »
Bert

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 533
Reply with quote  #1 
I'm doing some pre-planning for my next collector or two. Here's the side of my house with my current 25 SQ ft collector.

south-side-w-collector.jpg 
The collector is toward the back (right side of photo).
I'm thinking about adding these two this Spring and Summer.

South-Wall-Solar.jpg  Was thinking that the low profile one on the garage would be more neighborhood and wife friendly and it still would have a lot of square feet. It's the closest to the street.
Would 20' long be too much for the air flow?
These two would add 168 SQ feet to my dinky 25 SQ, for a total of 193. That should help out a lot I would think.

I want at least one of these to be a zero pass. Was thinking the long low one would be good for that. What do you think?

Not sure about the other collector yet.

Anyhow you guys have helped me a lot with my questions so far and would like to get your ideas and thoughts about it.

The space for the proposed collectors get sun earlier than the current collector gets.



__________________
Bert K.
Michigan

https://www.youtube.com/user/1thinkhealthy/playlists

Garage_Hermit

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 2,240
Reply with quote  #2 
Hiya, Bert,

No doubt you have seen ... Scott's Downspout video

To be honest, since you are looking for stealth, I reckon you could do a lot worse than just copy this one...

Maybe just scale it up a bit...

G_H

__________________
(1)  "Heat goes from hot to cold, there is no directional bias"
(2) It's wrote, "voilĂ " unless talking musical instruments...
gbwillson

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 2,301
Reply with quote  #3 
I had to laugh...

I ALWAYS start thinking of my "next" collector while I'm in the middle of my latest build. And I don't have the room for any more. I either rip them apart or sell them.  I think it's an addiction of the best kind!!![biggrin][biggrin][biggrin]

A 4x20 ZeroPass would be ideal for the space outside the garage as the longer the flow in the collector, the better it performs. My neighbor and I both have 4x16 ZP's and have no problem pushing 400+CFM through. You will want that much flow to keep from overheating. My neighbor ended up adding a second fan for that very reason. The ZP has the lowest flow of any of the collectors I've tested, so you should be good.

Too bad your current collector put holes in the siding. A 4x??? collector to the back corner would have looked really good on the opposite side of the door to match the garage collector. 

Greg in MN
Bert

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 533
Reply with quote  #4 


GH
Yes, that's one is probably the video that originally brought me to this forum. In fact I thought that would be my first collector type. Then I kept reading and learned about the duel screen, cinfoil and the zero pass.

So many choices!

Greg,      
"Too bad your current collector put holes in the siding. A 4x??? collector to the back corner would have looked really good on the opposite side of the door to match the garage collector. "

Yeah, it would, but the window and electric meter is in the way.

I am leaning toward the ZP for the garage.  

Any thoughts on the type of collector that would work for the 11 x 8 area? Would one large one work, or make it two?  I rather have less inputs and outputs.

Also was wonder,,, Wood or metal frame?   



__________________
Bert K.
Michigan

https://www.youtube.com/user/1thinkhealthy/playlists
gbwillson

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 2,301
Reply with quote  #5 
Go from the meter/window to the corner. Isn't that your left edge for the 88sf collector? Almost any type of collector will work for the 11x8 area. I'd sure keep it a one intake and one exhaust. For that sf you should probably look at using 8" ducts for better flow. Some designs are more labor intensive, and some use more expensive materials. I'd stay away from metal, or at least using galvanized stud tracks. It makes the build more complicated when attaching parts inside. And my had some rust on them after only one winter. I'm still looking for a non-wood material that doesn't split or warp. Maybe composite decking...

Greg
Bert

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 533
Reply with quote  #6 
Meter to the corner would make a good match. Problem is the holes for my current panel is at the top. I wanted to have the intake at the bottom on my current collector, but it would have to go through the crawl space. The floor is too high. The crawl space is too tight to get to from inside in that area of the house. Toward the middle of the house there's more room in the crawl space to move around. It's taller and easy to get to.

I could shorten the original one and extend the new one all the way to the corner, but then the old collector probably wouldn't do much. It would hide the holes though.
There are more shadows at the backend as well until around 11:00 am.

__________________
Bert K.
Michigan

https://www.youtube.com/user/1thinkhealthy/playlists
Garage_Hermit

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 2,240
Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
The crawl space is too tight to get to from inside in that area of the house. Toward the middle of the house there's more room in the crawl space to move around. It's taller and easy to get to


Bert, Maybe the way around this problem, would be to penetrate the CS wall from outside, then sleeve the (LONG, rigid...) duct through the wall, from outside again, towards the accessible part of the CS.

So hopefully, you would not actually need to access the periphery wall from inside the CS...

=========
Another way to get heat into the house, would be to build a portico around the door...
Then the ducting just takes from, and delivers into, the portico.  Of course, you would then have to leave the inner door ajar, to let the air in & out...  (For security, you block the inner door with a casement stay).

G_H



__________________
(1)  "Heat goes from hot to cold, there is no directional bias"
(2) It's wrote, "voilĂ " unless talking musical instruments...
Bert

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 533
Reply with quote  #8 
I had to Google portia. LOL   My doorway actually is  recessed. 

doorway.jpg 

Not sure if we could do that though.

If I ran the collector horizontal I could actually come in above the floor, but Not sure about that either. Through the crawl space I could route it to the basement and then to another room possibly or just let the heat rise.

The left side of that 88 sq collector area has the larger crawl space. It's the right side that is a problem area.


__________________
Bert K.
Michigan

https://www.youtube.com/user/1thinkhealthy/playlists
Bert

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 533
Reply with quote  #9 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gbwillson

 My neighbor and I both have 4x16 ZP's and have no problem pushing 400+CFM through. You will want that much flow to keep from overheating. My neighbor ended up adding a second fan for that very reason.

Greg in MN


I was thinking that I will have to go with a big 120v fan for this one.
Would like to figure a way to add a 12v fan for a backup in case of a power failure.
Any thoughts on that?
Have you had any problems with the collector overheating when the power was lost?

What are your guys thoughts on a good fan? I have heard good and bad about inline fans. What other choices are there. It seems like a 400-700 cfm fan would work well no matter what kind, but I have no experience with fans that big.

__________________
Bert K.
Michigan

https://www.youtube.com/user/1thinkhealthy/playlists
stmbtwle

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 2,859
Reply with quote  #10 
You can get some pretty powerful 12v fans from the RV and marine industry, and while they ARE big you might be able to modify one to suit.  http://www.boatandrvaccessories.com/fan-tastic-vent-endless-breeze-fan.html

Another 12v option is a heater fan from a car. Unlike RV fans they're centrifugal blowers, but they're molded into the ductwork, so you have to get the entire duct (from a salvage yard) and cut it down to suit.  As they're designed to work with ductwork they might be better than the RV fan.

A third option would be to use your existing 120v fan, and provide a backup power supply using a small inverter and either a battery or solar panel.  You'd need an automatic switch of some sort to disconnect the line and turn on the backup power.

A different problem one can encounter here in the warmer climates and with water collectors is the collector stagnating when the thermostat turns it off.   In this case you need to dump the excess heat somehow.

__________________
Solar is like the wind. It may be free, but putting it to work isn't!
Willie, Tampa Bay
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.

 

web statistics