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mattie

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Heat exchanger


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Coachgeo

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Videos very informative....... but not very informative.  More info here  http://www.solardishsystem.com/index.html   but still not much help.

The big solar thermal plants storage heat in it now ow know it works.  Most seem to  use oil to heat by the sun and transfer that to the salt. So we know that works.  (link above does though givess smoke and freeze point of oil)  

Guess one could just heat salt directly?

But anyway... back to our purpose...... how do we home brew folk use salt storage?  How much salt?  Does it store heat longer than a tank of water with same R value? 

Advantages for us?   Cold climate storage?  Wont turn to steam or gaseous/ so less dangerous.

Anyone got practical info on salt storage?   
stmbtwle

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From what I understand water has a much higher heat capacity than salt so you would need a lot more salt or you would need a much higher temperature to store the same heat. This is possible in in large concentrating power plants but I'm not sure it's feasible in a home-brew setting. Also, you can't pump salt, so you'll have bring the heat to the salt, and take it away again. I suspect this is where the oil comes in, but that just adds to the complexity.

It make sense if you're storing high temperatures for a steam turbine, but to heat your home?

http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/specific-heat-capacity-d_391.html

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Willie, Tampa Bay
Coachgeo

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Quote:
Originally Posted by stmbtwle
From what I understand water has a much higher heat capacity than salt so you would need a lot more salt or you would need a much higher temperature to store the same heat. This is possible in in large concentrating power plants but I'm not sure it's feasible in a home-brew setting. Also, you can't pump salt, so you'll have bring the heat to the salt, and take it away again. I suspect this is where the oil comes in, but that just adds to the complexity. It make sense if you're storing high temperatures for a steam turbine, but to heat your home? http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/specific-heat-capacity-d_391.html
ahhhhh.... mucho thanx.  Link is very helpful.  

Part of the thinking behind this was...... if things break down in the system....... salt wont freeze and burst pipes, holding tank etc etc.  Or will it?
stmbtwle

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Yes that can happen.  Some folks use antifreeze.  Some use drainback systems.

I can think of a couple alternatives:

Use air collectors, and run air tubes through your reservoir of water. A large insulated tank of water inside the house isn't likely to freeze.

Use air collectors, blow the air through your bed of salt.  Recover heat the same way.  No freeze problems..


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Solar is like the wind. It may be free, but putting it to work isn't!
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mattie

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When i found those links i was investigating a method to create your own diy salt based PCM's(Phase change material) for use in a greenhouse.Info and a possible method on BIS.( 4th link below)

http://www.rgees.com/technology.php

http://www.allanstime.com/SolarHome/Eutectic_Salt/

http://www.pharmoutsourcing.com/Featured-Articles/37854-Phase-Change-Materials-A-Brief-Comparison-of-Ice-Packs-Salts-Paraffins-and-Vegetable-derived-Phase-Change-Materials/

http://www.builditsolar.com/Experimental/PCM/DIYPhaseChangeMaterial.htm


The you-tube clips are geared towards adapting some of the design principles used on large scale concentrated solar arrays
for domestic use.I decided i would post them as they may trigger some ideas for someone else on here.

https://www.mtholyoke.edu/~wang30y/csp/PTPP.html

Regards Mattie
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