Welcome to the Solar Collector
Brainstorming and Development Page!


 

Home

Hot Air Collector

Hot Water Project 1

Hot Water & Space Heating

Solar Electric

Solar Construction 101

FAQs

Best Collectors

Simply Solar
Register Calendar Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 2 of 4      Prev   1   2   3   4   Next
SolarInterested

Avatar / Picture

Spam Stomper
Registered:
Posts: 1,026
Reply with quote  #11 
Powerwall 2 Specs

  • Usable Capacity  13.5 kWh
  • Depth of Discharge  100%
  • Efficiency  90% round-trip
  • Power  7kW peak / 5kW continuous
  • Supported Applications  
  • Solar self-consumption 
  • Time of use load shifting
  • Backup
  • Off grid
  • Warranty  10 years
  • Scalable  Up to 9 Powerwalls
  • Operating Temperature  -4° to 122°F / -20°C to 50°C
  • Dimensions  L x W x D: 44" x 29" x 5.5" (1150mm x 755mm x 155mm)
  • Weight  264.4 lb / 110 kg
  • Installation  Floor or wall mounted Indoor or outdoor
  • Certification  UL and IEC certified Grid code compliant



One 14 kWh Powerwall battery $7,800

Installation and supporting hardware starts at $1,350

Total estimate $9,150


__________________
Both temperature rise and airflow are integral to comparing hot air collectors

Traveller

Registered:
Posts: 14
Reply with quote  #12 
Note: Merged with an existing topic. Admin

https://electrek.co/2016/11/17/tesla-solar-roof-cost-less-than-regular-roof-even-before-energy-production-elon-musk/
stmbtwle

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 2,699
Reply with quote  #13 
I would like to see the math, but in new construction or re-roofing, it might be possible.

Usually the PV panels are installed OVER an existing roof, so you not only pay for the PV but the roof as well. If you can eliminate the cost of the conventional roofing and it's installation you would save money. Claiming that the "solar roof" is less expensive than a "regular roof", I think is a stretch, especially when labor is factored in.


__________________
Solar is like the wind. It may be free, but putting it to work isn't!
Willie, Tampa Bay
Traveller

Registered:
Posts: 14
Reply with quote  #14 
I wonder how they wire all of the tiles together. Might there be a wiring harness for each row of tiles that each tile plugs into? I also wonder if each tile is screwed to the wooden roof strapping or if, like clay and concrete tiles, there is a lip sticking down at the top of the tile that merely hooks on the top of the strapping board and relies on gravity to hold it in place. Are these tiles heavy? What is the price per tile?

The one thing that bothers me about this company is they are very long on fanfare and quite short on details.
gbwillson

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 2,223
Reply with quote  #15 
I love this idea,

but...The tiles themselves "might" be cheaper than a premium shingle. But there is no way the labor will be. This is likely to be a certified dealer install only. Even if it was able to be installed by regular roofing contractors, you would still have to hire electricians to wire the entire setup. Oh, and I'm betting your homeowners insurance will take a healthy jump too. And let's not forget how much you will be charged for producing your own electricity once the utility companies start fighting back. There have been examples the last few years about utility companies fighting back against home owners producing too much electricity. First they offer you rebates to suck you in, you save some money. Then they either reduce or eliminate the rebates, or add "fees" so you end up breaking even or even paying more to run your solar setup. If a green, or any other program can't get by without government subsidies, it needs to fail! Subsidies are fine in the very short term, or as an incentive, but programs that need them to survive deserve to fail unless they can eventually stand on their own.

But it is an exciting time for solar. In the not too distant future I see almost anything being able to capture solar energy. Paints, coatings, and even materials used in manufacturing could soon have the ability to absorb solar rays. The big issue will be storage. There needs to be a quantum leap in storage of solar energy, or any kind of green energy for that matter. The solar wall Tesla is a good start, but here in the North, there are long stretches of cloudy days in the winter. So you will still need a power plant that doesn't rely exclusively on wind and solar. And right now that means either a coal, natural gas or nuclear power plant capable of producing ALL our energy needs until we can come up with something better.

"Just because something is "Green" doesn't make it better." 

I'll step down now...

Greg in MN



 
stmbtwle

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 2,699
Reply with quote  #16 
You got it Greg. Current systems mostly use grid tie, but the utilities don't much like being the "battery" for what amounts to a service charge. Eventually we are going to need more storage. Some town in south Texas has done that, they have a battery bank the size of a house (sodium-sulfur I think). I don't think they are solar, the battery is there for when the grid goes down, apparently frequently. http://www.popsci.com/technology/article/2010-04/texas-town-turns-monster-battery-backup-power

Here, the local utility (TECO) is putting in their own solar, and I understand they are installing their own batteries to go with it.

__________________
Solar is like the wind. It may be free, but putting it to work isn't!
Willie, Tampa Bay
Gordy

Registered:
Posts: 137
Reply with quote  #17 
Willie, Sounds like they are popping up all over the place ;-) As a heavy equipment operator, I did the dirt work on 3 solar sites his summer. Paynesville MN, 47 acres (site #3 of 3), Fairmont MN, 55 acres, and St John's University near St Joseph MN, 39 acres. And I have heard of 10 or 12 others around the state being built this summer. These are all grid tied of coarse. But if those batteries can aways be added if the price is right ;-)
__________________
Gordy,
Minnesota
stmbtwle

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 2,699
Reply with quote  #18 
Commercial PV has a lot going for it. There's no pollution or risk of radiation. From permit to up-and-running can be less than a year, compared to much longer for a coal or nuke plant. Once the plant is running, the "fuel" is free, and all that's left to do is read the meters and count the money. Battery technology is coming up to speed and will take care of the nights and cloudy days.

what's not to like?

__________________
Solar is like the wind. It may be free, but putting it to work isn't!
Willie, Tampa Bay
SolarInterested

Avatar / Picture

Spam Stomper
Registered:
Posts: 1,026
Reply with quote  #19 
Tesla Powerpacks + Solar Powering Kauai


__________________
Both temperature rise and airflow are integral to comparing hot air collectors
stmbtwle

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 2,699
Reply with quote  #20 
Beautiful!

__________________
Solar is like the wind. It may be free, but putting it to work isn't!
Willie, Tampa Bay
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.

 

web statistics