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Poll Results
 
 For comparison to a more dense single layer should I
 Modify the dual layer to a dense single layer, (current winner) 3 60%
 Modify the single layer to a more dense single layer 2 40%
 View Voters
Total votes: 5. This poll has been closed.


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solardan1959

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Reply with quote  #41 
I have been thinking and I think I am going to first make the single layer panel without flashing first.  This will then be compared to the more closely spaced double layer.  Then after that I will add flashing under the single layer and again compare the two panels.  I think more useful info will be gathered that way.
Dan

SolarInterested

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Reply with quote  #42 
Dan what are you paying for the pipe? It's missing from your costs list in the first post.
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Both temperature rise and airflow are integral to comparing hot air collectors
solardan1959

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Reply with quote  #43 
Solar Interested,
I'll go back and edit but it was 2.49 each and I have bought 16.
Dan 
solardan1959

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Reply with quote  #44 
Glued my stuff together today thinking about Handyman's post from page 1.
"The downside of just using tees at the bottom or very short pieces of pipe to join tees (as I have found out) is that if you have a leak, there is nothing to cut out and glue back on to.  You're going to have to fix that entire header (bottom or lower) ALL over!  USE PLENTY GLUE DAN!  Looks good!
handyman
"
It thought I was doing well till I got to the other end.  It worth reading my post about gluing here:
   
 

Note the long outputs, I did this for testing for water leaks and will cut them down if everything is okay.
I have straps holding down all the tubes and some on each end holding it tightly to the back to keep it as far as possible from the glass.  The next two photos show how far they are from the glass though I used a piece of wood so you can see it.





Then I painted it with Gloss black for now,


Then took it out in the sun,


Added Glass and filled up with water,


Hooked up my 5 gallon tank and filled it up through the panel.  The tank started at 75 but the sun quickly went away and I had to help my neighbor with a light problem with his truck.  When I got back an hour later even with little sun the temp was up to 98 in the tank and the panel temp was 114 degrees.  I went to a grad party for several hours and came back with still overcast skies but the temp was 102 in the tank and 111 in the panel.  when I actually measured the water it was 109 degrees.
Not bad for a first test with poor sun.
Dan
SolarInterested

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Reply with quote  #45 
Good job it looks great.
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Both temperature rise and airflow are integral to comparing hot air collectors
Garage_Hermit

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Reply with quote  #46 
Brilliant, Dan, you sure do not waste any time !

Can't wait to see the rest of the testing !

(I reckon your panel could handle TEN TIMES that amount, of water, at least !)

G_H

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handymanhdw

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Reply with quote  #47 
Dan, this dude is going to be cookin!  Great job!

Handymanhdw
solardan1959

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Reply with quote  #48 
Hopefully I'll get enough sun to find out tomorrow, My goal is to get from 75 degrees to 140 degrees in an hour for the 5 gallons.  May be ambitious for a 2X6 panel but you got to start somewhere.  I need to come up with a 55 gallon drum and see if I can heat it up in a day to 140.  Hopefully I'll get a good start on my second single layer panel also.
Thanks for the encouragement.
Dan
Scott Davis

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Reply with quote  #49 
Very, very awesome Dan!  I suspect when in full sun it is indeed going to be cooking!
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solardan1959

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Reply with quote  #50 
Been an interesting day though nothing turned out as expected.
First at 8 AM I decided to point my water heater east and catch the sun as it came over the trees.  I filled my tank through the collector at the starting temp for water was 75 degrees  I thought I filled it up too much as the tank expanded so much it started cracking my Styrofoam cover.  It seemed to really heat up at first about 5 degrees a minute and I was checking it about 20 minutes later and the tank was reading about 90 and it blew the inlet line off the tank while I was standing there.  I lost some water but realized what had happened was when I filled it I did not fill it all the way but because the air was not getting out it built a lot of pressure up and that is what was expanding the tank.  Since it was not full of water I do not have any reference for how much was in there and with less water it would heat faster.
  I added more water but some clouds came in so the panel was staying less than 130 degrees.  Eventually I stopped at 11 AM and 132 on my tank probe but when I check the actual water temp it was over 143 degrees.  Not great but not bad and still over 2.5 hours from solar noon.
  I emptied out the tank and filled it directly from the hose, it read 58 degrees.  Since I had good sun I tried to do my 1 hour temp rise test starting at 11:30 but ten minutes into it and a steady rise of temp my pump quit running.  I tried another battery but got the same results and saw steam or smoke rising from the pump.  I got out my back up drill pump and the collector temp was really rising, it was over 210 when I got my drill pump running but for some reason continued to climb.  (got up to 239, that's a pretty good stagnation test), I realized I hooked the pump up backwards and due to my setup it was not flowing through the collector but after I swapped it the temp quickly dropped down to 160 degrees.  Of course the tank temp went up a bit too.  By 12:05 I had to shut down for a thunderstorm, our first for the year, but the water temp was 92 a 34 degree rise in 35 minutes with about 15 minutes of down time for the pump swap.  Looks like the storm is gone but I think I'm done for the day.  (I am making my second collector though, just finishing up the frame.
Dan
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