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Archdemon

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Reply with quote  #41 

Would i benefit anything from making it a inwall solution?

Ie cut out the facade and make it a piece of the facade.
22163997_10155601257710761_25475949_o2.jpg 


Archdemon

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Reply with quote  #42 
Seems like i have no other choice now since the wife doesnt wanna block the windows
stmbtwle

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Reply with quote  #43 
Been there... women are generally much more interested in fashion, than function.

Yes that is an option, the collector doesn't HAVE to be black. You might lose a bit of efficiency but any dark color will work.

You could also put a collector between the bacement windows and a third on the addition.

Get one built and running, even if it's a small one. Once she feels the heat coming from it, she may be easier to persuade.

While running at low temperatures is more efficient, a hgher, more tangible temperature may be better at convincing skeptics. A fan speed control can be your friend.

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Willie, Tampa Bay
gbwillson

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Reply with quote  #44 
Is the outline roughly the 1M x 6M you mentioned? If so, a nicely built collector would look like it belonged as part of the house. Many people have attached their collector directly to the side of the house. Some have removed the siding, some have left it in place. I think with your wife still a bit unsure as to what you are getting into, you could consider a temporary mount so the siding doesn't get removed until you get the spousal seal of approval. So mounting either without removing the siding, OR, consider a temporary stand a few feet(3-4') away from the house and using the two windows for access to the house. That way, if the results(aesthetic or performance-wise) are not to either of your satisfaction, you can remove the collector with no damage to the house. Once approved, you can make a permanent attachment to the side of the house with NO holes or removed siding.

Greg in MN
Archdemon

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Reply with quote  #45 
Yeah thats the 1x6 aprox. She agreed to building it into wall. If i make it look nice, but another problem now...

I need to pull hot air downwards into the basement.

https://h-tune.co.uk/mishimoto-slimline-electric-radiator-fan-8/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI6IHvwvrO1gIVj5QYCh3hCAkmEAQYASABEgIquPD_BwE

Would something like that suffice?
stmbtwle

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Reply with quote  #46 
Pulling the hot air down into the basement shouldn't be a problem.

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Willie, Tampa Bay
Archdemon

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Reply with quote  #47 
Quote:
Originally Posted by stmbtwle
Pulling the hot air down into the basement shouldn't be a problem.


How much cfm would you suggest in total? Since its kinda cfm vs dB [smile]
gbwillson

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Reply with quote  #48 
How many fans are we talking about total? The fans moving air through the collector should be more than enough, unless your duct runs are very long or convoluted. So perhaps a primary fan(s) and a booster fan, if needed. It doesn't take much to move warm air downward, against its natural buoyancy. And just to clarify, you will bring the warmed air into the house on the main floor, down into the basement, where it can be distributed to warm the main floor above? And will the supply(return air) be coming from the main floor too?

As far as the total CFM needed, It depends on the ducting. The collector itself will need roughly 300-400CFM output. The ducting will add to that. Note that the fan output CFM WILL be lower than the free air rating of the fan(s). If in doubt, go higher CFM, as you can always lower the fan output. In fact, rather than guessing, why not hold off on everything but the primary fan(s). You can always add more fans if the output temps are too high.

Greg in MN
Archdemon

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Reply with quote  #49 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gbwillson
How many fans are we talking about total? The fans moving air through the collector should be more than enough, unless your duct runs are very long or convoluted. So perhaps a primary fan(s) and a booster fan, if needed. It doesn't take much to move warm air downward, against its natural buoyancy. And just to clarify, you will bring the warmed air into the house on the main floor, down into the basement, where it can be distributed to warm the main floor above? And will the supply(return air) be coming from the main floor too?

Greg in MN


Correct ill be pulling the air into the basement and move it around down their and let it soar up if that makes sense.

Also found this cheap
http://www.solerpalau.com/td-1000-200-silent-230v-50.html

100$ used
gbwillson

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Reply with quote  #50 
Archdemon-

I added a paragraph above addressing CFM needs.

Mixed flow fans, such as the one in your link, are a great way to move a lot of air, while still being fairly quiet. Here is a link to one I have had my eye on:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B073S4CPT2/ref=ox_sc_sfl_title_3?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A1OIIZJKTXNTOC

It's quiet, <42db, and has a fan speed control. It's not of the quality of the one you referenced, but should suffice for my needs. Amazon has quite a large selection of inline fans available. I used "mixed-flow inline fans" as my search keyword.

Greg in MN
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