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myk3y

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Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by colinmcc
myk3y He only wants to go 10m from one 180w panel. Why would he need 100m? [confused] And have you checked the regs on using water pipe to enclose cable, let alone only a few inches below ground? Also have you buried a yellow streamer reading 'Danger buried cable below" above your cable? 


Because I didn’t read :) for some reason I had 30M in my head...

And to the others - no, and no. Regs, on a farm? NZ is far less bureaucratic than wherever you are. But for low voltage in the UK, you wouldn’t be required to do so if it doesn’t exit the boundaries of your property.

stmbtwle

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Reply with quote  #12 
Different areas have different regulations. However with 12v you can get away with most anything.

In my experience the time WILL come when you want to add another panel or two for more power. If you oversize the wiring now, it'll save the work/expense of redoing it later.

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colinmcc

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Reply with quote  #13 
Quote:
Originally Posted by myk3y

And to the others - no, and no. Regs, on a farm? NZ is far less bureaucratic than wherever you are.


myk3y  When you referred to burying cable on your farm, you said 240v, so in the interest of safety I made my point, i very much doubt that safety regs in NZ are so lax as to allow what you describe. Even if they are, it is still extraordinarily dangerous practice.

As far as the original poster's question goes, yes of course 12v doesn't require as much safety, but I'd venture that on an allotment where, presumably folk dig to at least a spade depth, LV cable should be 12" or more underground,
myk3y

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Reply with quote  #14 
What you do on your own property is up to you. If you injure someone as a result, you will be held liable. We are sensible when it comes to bureaucracy.

The power in question was to four 20’ containers used for storage, workshop, etc. and ‘off the beaten track’ when it comes to general farm traffic. Much safer than overhead wires, which had a much higher likelihood of being snagged by some bumpkin driving a Ute or farm vehicle.

And again, I didn’t read. I overlooked that it was at an allotment. Given that it’s in Portsmouth, it will be nicked long before someone digs up a cable :)

In such a situation I would place the trench and the cable in a position unlikely to be used for planting spuds. Using your head in planning such an installation is always a good idea. Solving potential problems is half the fun, no?
myk3y

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Posts: 31
Reply with quote  #15 
Quote:
Originally Posted by stmbtwle
Different areas have different regulations. However with 12v you can get away with most anything.

In my experience the time WILL come when you want to add another panel or two for more power. If you oversize the wiring now, it'll save the work/expense of redoing it later.


Yep. Given the cost of doubling the cable run vs redoing it at a later date, overspec wins every time!
colinmcc

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Posts: 172
Reply with quote  #16 
Quote:
Originally Posted by myk3y
What you do on your own property is up to you. If you injure someone as a result, you will be held liable. We are sensible when it comes to bureaucracy.


Try reading the NZ code. Hear is an extract from NZECP 51:2004, read it and see how many code violations your "What you do on your own property is up to you" claim results in.

3.7 UNDERGROUND CABLES

3.7.1 Dig a trench 600 mm deep.
3.7.2 Bed directly buried underground cables on 50 mm of sand,
and cover them with at least another 50 mm of sand.
3.7.3 Provide a physical barrier that protects the cable, using
ground treated timber (H4), concrete slabs or plastic slabs
(polymeric coverstrips) laid on top of the sand, see Table 4.
3.7.4 Alternatively the cable can be protected by using heavy duty
plastic conduit or galvanised pipe. No bedding of sand is
then required.

TABLE 4:REQUIREMENTS FOR UNDERGROUND CABLES PHYSICAL PROTECTION
If you are using: It/They must be:
Timber (a) 100 mm minimum width
(b) 25 mm thick
(c) ground treated to class H4.
at least 50 mm thick.

Concrete slabs

Plastic slabs (polymeric at least 3 mm thick coverstrips)

PVC conduit or PVC pipe The pipe diameter should be such so that the cable is able to easily slip down the pipe.

Galvanised pipe The pipe diameter should be such so that the cable is able to easily slip down the
pipe.

OF3.7.5 Back fill the trench to cover the cable by 200 mm of fill; then lay a plastic marker strip over the full length of cable in the trench. Fill the trench.

3.7.6 Put up marker signs where any cable enters or leaves a building. This will identify that there is a cable located underground near the building.

3.7.7 If the cables rise above ground to enter a building or other structure, you must provide mechanical protection for the cable from the trench depth to a height of 2.0 m above ground.
myk3y

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Posts: 31
Reply with quote  #17 
Congratulations on your google-fu.

Now find the exemptions for rural and farm buildings.

What a petty little man you are.
colinmcc

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Posts: 172
Reply with quote  #18 
myk3y Petty? Nope, if you wish to kill yourself by your stupidity, feel free to go ahead, just try not to involve any family, friends or animals on your farm.  [thumb]


SolarInterested

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Reply with quote  #19 
Lets be civil people. Move on.

Mike
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