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mattie

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Reply with quote  #21 
I remember reading somewhere that air to air heat exchangers suffer from the same freezing problems in colder climates.Maybe this is pointing in the right direction
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freeze_stat

Regards Mattie

solardan1959

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Reply with quote  #22 
Greg,
   Permanent is a funny word, what is permanent? [smile]

  I have mentioned in the past that the wife wants me do put a deck type floor in.  Even If I did this it may be fixed to the walls but probably would be a boxed set of stringers with deck boards on top.  This would "float" on the ground.
  The other option is the sand/pavers or gravel option which she is not a fan of.

wood = more expensive but probably easier than pavers and maybe I can blow hot air in there all day to warm up the ground.  Also less mass so less time to warm up in colder weather.

pavers = more mass so a better heat sink in hot weather and more heat at night.  Still fairly expensive an a lot more work especially if I run and pex or air tubes through it.

But some type of floor and I need to add some type of finish on upper side walls, I only ran the bead board up for 4 feet.

Dan
Garage_Hermit

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Reply with quote  #23 
Hi, Dan,

FWIW, here is a method of retrofitting your sunspace floor, using polyiso board, and bricks on top.

http://inspectapedia.com/Energy/Greenhouse_Insulation.php

Don't forget to insulate the edges !

 

Quote:

To increase the new floor thickness, and thus its thermal mass, you can set the brick on edge. Since you are setting the brick over compressible material, a flexible (mortarless) paving system would be easiest. In this type of system, the floor bricks are tightly packed to one another without wet mortar. A mix of sand and dry mortar may be swept between the joints and dampened for a more solid and less permeable floor.

You may set the bricks on the foam insulation or add a layer of plywood underlayment first. In either case, a double layer of 15# felt paper is recommended directly under the brick to cushion and protect the underlayment. Since heat loss is greatest from slab edges, you might want to thermally isolate the new floor from the foundation walls by adding a foam strip at the floor's edge. You can conceal the foam strip with a baseboard (sketch above-left).



Hope your climate is warming up and your tomatoes starting to shine !

G_H

 


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(1)  "Heat goes from hot to cold, there is no directional bias"
(2) It's wrote, "voilà" unless talking musical instruments...
solardan1959

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Reply with quote  #24 
Hermit,
   Missed this post, thanks for the suggestion.  I have thought of a few variants of this same theme, one was to lay down some foam and then put washed stone gravel on top of that.  Easy but not as nice of a surface to walk on or set a chair on.  The other would be to use the larger patio squares, 1'x1' or 18"X18", or any other variant.  that would be quick and easy and non permanent and still add mass for heat storage.
  The unusual cold for the winter has extended into the spring.  We still have no leaves yet but have seen a few 60 degree days.  Had the kayak in and went fishing for the first time yesterday but it was pretty much a waste of time except for the exercise.  The tomatoes, some petunias, peppers, and some viney stuff are growing but not as well as I would have hopes.  We had some issues with a large batch of seeds when the temps dropped way back a month ago and the seeds never came up.  Oh well, it's all a learning curve.
  The daytime temps have been pretty good, about 90ish in the greenhouse, probably because the sun is high enough it does not hit the back wall and heat it up, just gets to the dirt and gravel.


Dan
Garage_Hermit

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Reply with quote  #25 
Hi, Dan,

Nice to have your news !

Better not tell U what my temps are today - U might get jealous !

Here is a cheap sort-of heat absorber to go under your floor, based on
my favorite neglected technology (garbage bags, of course...)
[Energy_img054]
Just fill 'em up, tie 'em up, cover 'em up, and then forget them !

You could lay a few lengths of 4 x 4's on the ground, with a sheet of plywood over, the bags being underneath the wood floor...

they should hold a good part of your daytime heat, and store it overnight.

I had an hour digging the crawlspace t his morning, and am just steeling myself up to go and have another session !

Cheers for now,

G_H




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(1)  "Heat goes from hot to cold, there is no directional bias"
(2) It's wrote, "voilà" unless talking musical instruments...
solardan1959

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Reply with quote  #26 
Missing something, what is in the Garbage bags?
Garage_Hermit

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Reply with quote  #27 
er...water...

for thermal mass.

Sorry, Dan, I ought to have explained better ... [frown]


The idea is, the water  holds any excess heat hanging around during the day, and releases it at night, therefore the Sunspace temperature stays a bit more constant, instead of oscillating up and down.

The water does not go anywhere (hopefully...).

G_H

__________________
(1)  "Heat goes from hot to cold, there is no directional bias"
(2) It's wrote, "voilà" unless talking musical instruments...
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