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littlecreek

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hi all, been lurking / daydreaming for a long time.

I'm about ready to start my solar air heater project and have a couple questions I havent found answers for.

1) I have gotten a couple sets of tempered double pane patio doors. Is it better to leave them double pane or seperate them and double my collector size?

2) If my collector is mounted flush to the outside sheathing of my house, do I need to insulate the back?


gbwillson

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Reply with quote  #2 
Welcome littlecreek!

Depending on where you live the extra insulation can be helpful as the biggest heat loss is through the glazing. However...doubling the size of the collector will more than offset any loss though a single pane for glass. A larger collector, or in your case doubled in size, will capture more BTU's. I've never heard of someone building a solar heater complaining about too much heat. 

Unless you plan on stripping the siding off your house you should insulate the back of the collector. Otherwise, frigid air will be able to get between the siding and the back of the collector. The back of the collector is another large surface that has potential for heat loss. I suppose you could seal off any gaps between the collector and the siding, but...

Greg in MN[wave]
littlecreek

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Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks for the reply.

Live on an old farm in Manitoba, so down to -40 C in the winter but average of -20 C. 
My thought process on the glazing was that air leaks would be more of a problem than radiant/transmission loss so If I can keep it tightly sealed the big panel would serve me better. Also, siding definitely is being removed so I was hoping that by building it flush against outer sheathing I could really use the panel as siding of sorts. (all the siding really needs to be replaced so I thought I might double up the panels use) 

Ive got basically an endless supply of corrugated metal, as well as tons of tin that I believe was from an overhead door. It's all just been sitting in a pile since we demolished a bunch of derelict outbuildings when we purchased the farm. If I line the back of the collector and the face of the collector with corrugated tin, with maybe an inch in between, would the ridges create enough turbulence to heat the air suitably? Also, if the inlet is in a bottom corner and the outlet is in the opposite upper corner, will the air diffuse(?) enough through the collector or would there likely be dead spaces there? And if so , how to remedy? 

Thanks
Carlton



SolarInterested

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Reply with quote  #4 
Carlton this might be of interest - Bill's Manitoba corrugated metal solar collector (link)
 
 

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Both temperature rise and airflow are integral to comparing hot air collectors
littlecreek

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Reply with quote  #5 
I actually read the entire thread earlier today. Thanks
littlecreek

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Reply with quote  #6 
Bills original panel sounds like what I'm planning.
littlecreek

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Reply with quote  #7 
So it begins. Giving myself a month to complete this. Taken off 100 sq ft of siding , so minus the 2 plenum/manifold, that'll be what I'm looking at. Have more than enough single pane glass to work with.
Was originally gonna leave back uninsulated but decided to use roxul r14 for back and sides.

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SolarInterested

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Reply with quote  #8 
Carlton I believe you can edit the title of your first post to better reflect your project. If not post it here and I'll edit it for you. Good luck and good weather.

Mike
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Both temperature rise and airflow are integral to comparing hot air collectors
littlecreek

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Reply with quote  #9 
Thanks Mike. Done.


littlecreek

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Reply with quote  #10 
So I've been finding myself caught up with indecision on what type of solar air heater to make for my first project. There is so much information available that I've been flip-flopping on design depending on the last article I've read or video I've watched. If I don't start, it won't get done and ultimately anything is better than nothing, So whether my project is 50% efficient or 80% efficient, it's still free heat. The only material I've got to buy is black paint & silicone, as well as fan and ducting, so pay back will likely be short.
My project is going to be a back pass design using corrugated tin, with the back and front panel placed face to face to hopefully cause more air turbulence and heat scrubbing. I've got a couple questions if anyone can help.

1) how large of a space should there be between front and back of collector? Seeing that it's corrugated, I suppose the space should be measured at the flat section not the ridges? I've read on hear that the ZP collector's optimum was          1.75" so I'm assuming that it should be roughly the same. 

2) with spacing in mind, I had an idea of using screws of the appropriate length put through one of the layers of tin to act as a support/spacer between the layers. It so happens that I have a ton of screws and nails of all sizes in one of my barns, and I was wondering if I used a bunch, if they would act as fins for turbulence and/or heat transfer. I realise round and thin as they are, they may not be very effective but I have so many that guaranteed I would run out of energy before I ran out of screws.

3) How close should the glazing be to top collector?

4) Last is where I'm most confused , I've had a hard time finding diagrams of plenums/manifolds (honestly don't know the difference between the two).  I want the intake to come from my crawl space and exhaust through my soffit. Can I just have the bottom manifold as a big box along the bottom of the collector, with a slit all along the top of the manifold, leading into the collector area? If so, is the top manifold just the same? Does the size of the manifold have to be according to the collector volume (like 100 cubic inches for 10x10x1" )? Or is it sized according to the fan used? Should the intake vent be larger equal or smaller than exhaust vent?  Push or pull, or is it a matter of preference?

If I could be pointed in the right direction, it'd be greatly appreciated


-Carlton
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