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gbwillson

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Reply with quote  #61 
I think a 3rd(middle) screen would work to a point, but how much sun will the back-most screen layer get? 20%? And if the primary heated screens are closer to the cool glazing in a shallow collector box, it might offset any gains. My screen gap testing did make me think about 3 layers when I found out how large a gap our ZP test seemed to prefer. Seatec built a 6 layer screen build that he called a ZP, but if I recall, the air had to pass through screen layers to exit the collector. Not much light was going to bounce off the back of his collector and make it out again...



Greg in MN

stmbtwle

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Reply with quote  #62 
It was just a thought. The longer and narrower the passages are, the more power it will take to push the air through them. A wider gap with an extra screen or two should make for easier "breathing". Sure the back screen will get a bit less sun, but I think that should be more than compensated for by the middle screen. Yes it would require a thicker collector to accommodate the wider gap.
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Willie, Tampa Bay
dbc

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Reply with quote  #63 
Thanks for the clarification, Greg.  I think I got the time sequence mixed up - thought Krautman made the comment after the gap tests instead of before.
SunFun

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Reply with quote  #64 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gbwillson
The top is done. The top frame is made from welded aluminum angles for the outside, and some cross pieces for both stability and to help hold down the glazing. The twin wall glazing was both attached and sealed to the aluminum frame with 3M industrial foam tape. The tape is about ½mm thick and is designed to hold objects that weigh 30 pounds. It is extremely sticky!

3 Years on, have there been any problems with this method of fixing the twin wall to the aluminum?

gbwillson

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Reply with quote  #65 
Craig has not mentioned any issues up to this point, but he likely wouldn't notice any issues until closer inspection. He is planning to open the at some point before next winter for a quick inspection. I'll update this once he opens the unit. Keep in mind the adhesive tape is industrial grade and designed to be used outdoors. So hopefully there will be nothing to report.

Greg in MN
SunFun

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Reply with quote  #66 
OK Thanks Greg. I will wait for your update. I was particularly curious if there were any problems caused by different rates of expansion of the twinwall and alumimum.
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