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Garage_Hermit

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Reply with quote  #51 
Hi, Keith, just add 15° to your latitude:  41 + 15 = 56, so I guess 60 degrees will do !
otherwise, try this out:
http://solarelectricityhandbook.com/solar-angle-calculator.html

Enjoy the holiday !
G_H

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Keith671

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Reply with quote  #52 
Thanks G H
Just found the site you sent before reading your post. I am think of making it adjustable. Working on a drawing. Looks like from:
Nov-Jan  60 degrees
Feb- Apr 40 degrees
May-July 25 degrees
Aug-Oct 40 degrees

So would only need three adjustments. It varies about 8 degrees each month.


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Keith R. in PA.
Keith671

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Reply with quote  #53 
Drawing of end brace with 1" hole drilled for pin or maybe a piece of conduit to lean box against. Hinged on bottom with door hinges, so can be removed by taking out the hinge pin. Boxes would pivot between two of these braces. Any suggestions? 

Attached Images
jpeg collector-stand_(1024x665).jpg (71.94 KB, 101 views)


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Keith R. in PA.

solardan1959

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Reply with quote  #54 

Keith,
   I like the way you think, Must be a PA thing, I grew up in Erie county.  Use this to determine the sun angle at any given time.  Or better yet if you can adjust just point it at it at solar noon.
http://www.susdesign.com/sunangle/index.php

If you click on tools at the top of the page they have some other good calculators.
Dan

GaryBIS

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Reply with quote  #55 
Hi Keith,
Another tool to use is PVWatts.
http://rredc.nrel.gov/solar/calculators/pvwatts/version1/version1_index.html

While its mainly intended for PV panel studies, it does give solar radiation for the collector tilt, azimuth and location that you choose.  It also takes into account the weather at your location.

Once you fill in where you are and the tilt and azimuth you want, it outputs the solar radiation on that panel for each month.  You can run it for several tilts and just see how much you actually gain by varying the tilt from month to month.  Sometimes is pretty small.

Another factor with solar thermal collectors is that their efficiency varies with the ambient temperature -- they are less efficient in cold weather (the opposite of PV panels).   if you are using a single compromise tilt angle, this tends to favor going with a steeper tilt that favors the colder months more.  But, if you are going to adjust the tilt several times a year, then I don't think it makes any difference.

Gary

Keith671

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Reply with quote  #56 
Built stand ends last night as per previous drawing. Now need to dig holes for posts and orient collectors to South. Also added up expenses for the two 30" X 68" boxes. Attached a spreadsheet. Solar-Collector-Materials-Copper.xls     

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Keith R. in PA.
Keith671

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Reply with quote  #57 
I have about 100 feet from the house to the collector and planning to add more collector square footage later. I was going to use 1" pex Ox barrier. Does anyone have an opinion on using 1" vs 3/4"? I only want to dig a ditch and bury it once. Also ideas on cheapest 4" pipe to bury it in.
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Keith R. in PA.
moosemagicco

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Reply with quote  #58 
I really cant speak to the first part of your question whether 1" vs 3/4" is better.

Seems to me that the type of pipe kind of depends on what it is doing for you.  If it is just to facilitate removal later with out having to dig it up  I would think that something like this would work well.



http://www.homedepot.com/p/Advanced-Drainage-Systems-4-in-x-100-ft-Corex-Drain-Pipe-Solid-04510100/100537518#.Ud2ogKw_X5w

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Scott in CO
Keith671

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Reply with quote  #59 
I'm leaning towards the thin wall sewer drain pipe. I think the corrugated pipe would be very hard to get your insulated pex through. This stuff seems like the cheapest solution.

http://www.lowes.com/pd_24160-1814-S/M+06004++0600_0__?productId=3133159&Ntt=4+drain+pipe&pl=1&currentURL=%3FNtt%3D4%2Bdrain%2Bpipe&facetInfo=

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Keith R. in PA.
moosemagicco

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Reply with quote  #60 
I'd have to look at both in person.  Personally I'd go for the cheaper solution.

The advantages of the corrugated that I can think of would be:
       Cost - $62 vs $112
       No fittings or glue -    Easier make the bend to come out of the ground at each end.
       All one piece - just roll it out.
       The corrugations allow for elevation changes better than rigid pipe would.

Disadvantage
       one long roll might make it harder to work with
       possible ease of "stuffing' the insulated pipes through
       might crush easier under earth weight  (will it have the possibility of being driven over?)
       10' sections would possibly be better to pull apart to trouble shoot / fix problems

???  Really could be a tossup either way.

-S

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Scott in CO
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