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gbwillson

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Reply with quote  #1 
Use flex duct insulation!

Have a helper hold one end of a section of the desired length being used. They should only hold the insulation. Next, pull and turn the flex tube clockwise. The flex tube will contract so that you can easily pull out the flex tube. 
Smooth off any sharp or jagged edges so they don't get caught on the fiberglas insulation.  Now you can simply slide the PVC or metal duct inside the now empty insulted tube. 

Greg in MN[comp]

solarusmc

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Reply with quote  #2 
Hi Greg,

just wanted to mention this to you.

I too have inserted pipe into the flex insulation but found that doing this created more noise then if the air was flowing thru the flex insulation itself.

My solution was.. yes.. insert the piping into the flex insulation from the collector to the house but leave the last 6 to 8 ft of the run entering your house flexible only... with no piping inside.

This eliviates '99% of the fan noise' created by the metal tubing from entering thru the supply vent.

Just wanted to let ya know what I learned via experimentation.

Take care and Happy Holiday Season to you!

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Pat B. Warwick, Rhode Island Rest Assured! Comments and/or suggestions I make here at the forums on 'your' projects as well as my own have all been carefully and scientifically calculated by the 'seat of my pants'
gbwillson

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Reply with quote  #3 
Hi Pat-

Good point! That is why forced air furnaces have a flexible leather or vinyl skirt between the furnace and the plenum. It helps to cushion or absorb the sounds and vibrations from the motor and when air is pushed into the metal ductwork. I'm betting a one foot section would be all that's needed to greatly reduce the sounds. In any case, the flex should be stretched tight for reduced resistance.

Greg in MN
EcoMotive

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Reply with quote  #4 
Good stuff. I was wondering how I could easily and effectively insulate some rigid metal ducting that I just installed in my basement. I try to avoid flex duct at all costs on account of the horrible resistance to flow.

Lance in Newfoundland 

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Minsc

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Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Originally Posted by solarusmc
Hi Greg,

just wanted to mention this to you.

I too have inserted pipe into the flex insulation but found that doing this created more noise then if the air was flowing thru the flex insulation itself.

My solution was.. yes.. insert the piping into the flex insulation from the collector to the house but leave the last 6 to 8 ft of the run entering your house flexible only... with no piping inside.

This eliviates '99% of the fan noise' created by the metal tubing from entering thru the supply vent.

Just wanted to let ya know what I learned via experimentation.

Take care and Happy Holiday Season to you!


I'll have to remember this.  One gripe I had when watching videos of hot air collectors in operation was how noisy they were.
gbwillson

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Reply with quote  #6 
Keep in mind that most of the videos today are shot with a crappy phone mic so it is not ideal. Having a high powered fan blowing in the living room would be troublesome. But that same amount of noise in the next room may be fine. There are also plenty of ways to quiet down the noise from the fan. Building an enclosure around the fan to hold an air filter can deaden much of the noise, especially if the enclosure is lined with foam or other sound deadening materials.

Greg in MN
gbwillson

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Reply with quote  #7 
I should add that to easily insert metal ducts into the insulation sleeve, there are two tricks that I found after many frustrating tries. You may want to screw and tape sections together once you have the ducting figured out. I also tape the side seams, since at high volumes of air these leak too. It also makes the metal duct sections stronger.

1. Attach a sturdy cone or duct reducer to one end of your assembled metal ducts and tape in place. This cone needs to be open at the tip so air can pass through. This helps keep the sharp metal duct edges from catching on the insulation while . 

2. Insert a fan into the opposite end of the insulation sleeve and turn on. This forces the sleeve wide open and allows the metal ducts to slide effortlessly into the insulation sleeve. If the fan is too weak to fully inflate the sleeve, try partially closing off the sleeve end opposite the fan. I tried countless times to simply slide the cone ended ducts without the fan, but this takes much longer and the ducts still hang up from time to time. The fan allows the sleeve to slide around corners without catching.

Greg in MN[wave]
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