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Seatec

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Reply with quote  #1 
Make a cover for the panel out of marine grade vinyl, has soft material on the inside to protect the glazing, fasten it on with snaps or Velcro.

brokejame

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Reply with quote  #2 
this idea looks promising, i think i should buy a cover now!!!
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FlaveriHappy

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Reply with quote  #3 
Just in case anyone comes by this here post. Did you know that winter weather is actually better for your solar panels to produce energy? This doesn’t necessarily mean that winter months will lead you to produce more than you would in the summer months. The good news first — minimal amounts of snow can have little impact on your solar production. Heavy snow, on the other hand, may be an issue for your solar panels. A large covering of snow can prevent absorption and will need to be removed in order for you to receive energy.
stmbtwle

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Reply with quote  #4 
Uh, what's "snow"?

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Willie, Tampa Bay
gbwillson

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Reply with quote  #5 
Willie-

Snow is the white powder celebrities snort up their noses to help them think they are better than lowly peons. 

Greg in MN
SunFun

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Reply with quote  #6 
Snow being a problem depends on your lattitude. I am so far north that the best panel angle to maximize winter output is vertical, so no problem with snow settling.

Snow on the ground though is a bonus. I have evacuated tubes mounted vertically on a south-facing wall near ground level. The ground slopes away from the house to the south and the winter sun is barely above the horizon. The net result is there is a lot of reflection off the snow onto the panels, boosting output.

This has set me thinking about a summer cover for air panels I plan to build this summer. Removing the panels in summer is never going to happen so I want to cover the panels to prevent them overheating when I don't need to heat the house. My thinking is to make a hinged cover something like a door. During summer this "door" can be closed to prevent the panel operating. In winter the door can be opened. Having a reflector on the inside of the door - or just painting it white - could reflect additional sunlight onto the panel if the door were fixed in an open position at an appropriate angle. So the cover would also serve a useful purpose in winter, and this approach also eliminates any problem with storing the cover over the winter. Has anyone tried this already?
stmbtwle

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Reply with quote  #7 
Greg,
Thanks I knew it had to be something like that! 🤣

Sunfun,
Seems to me reflective covers it would be a good idea. It's been discussed at length here but I don't know if anyone's tried it. In my latitude, air collectors are pretty much useless. The only time they produce any heat is when I don't need it, and a water-based system is not cost effective for something I'd use 2 months a year. Instead we use PV, which can run the heat pump year round.

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Solar is like the wind. It may be free, but putting it to work isn't!
Willie, Tampa Bay
SunFun

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Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by stmbtwle
In my latitude, air collectors are pretty much useless.

Oh That is interesting. What is your latitude? I am at 62° North, which I don't think will be any problem.
stmbtwle

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Reply with quote  #9 
I'm at 27N... in our short winter we need heat at night (when there's no sun) but rarely in the daytime when there is, so an air collector is not needed. I often have to switch from heat to AC and back again (in the same day). The only thing that seems to work is heat storage, which pretty much dictates a water-based system. For the two months a year I'd use it, it's just not cost efficient. PV works year round and is pretty much hassle-free.

You are in a much different climate and can use heat in the daytime, when air collectors are useful. For night time heat you might try a water based collector, with heat storage in your basement, if you have one.

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Solar is like the wind. It may be free, but putting it to work isn't!
Willie, Tampa Bay
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