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stmbtwle

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Reply with quote  #41 
I'm aware of how a heat pump works, I have one.  However if you're taking that heat from an area which is normally heated (in my case the laundry room) then you have to make up that heat from another source, so you haven't gained all that much. If it's in a garage which is not normally heated, then you have. 

Then there's the difference in cost of the water heater.  Home Depot gets $1399 for their heat pump "hybrid" water heater.  The conventional electric water heater (same brand, size) is $375 (or zero if you use your existing one).  That buys a fair amount of PV.  So while the heat pump is more "efficient", it may not be cost-effective.  In ten years (assuming we're still here) it might be a different proposition.


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Willie, Tampa Bay

ChrisJ

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Reply with quote  #42 
I was able to purchase my Heat Pump Water Heater(HPWH) for $1000.00 then got a $750.00 rebate from the utility, it had to be installed by a licensed plumber $200.00.

The heat for my basement is made by a Ground Source Heat Pump(GSHP) so the hit for what heat is taken out of the air is small considering the COP of the GSHP.

I am hoping the HPWH will not even turn on from late spring to early fall, then I will start charging up the cement floor in the garage.

"Assuming we're still here"  Where are we going??  
Rick H Parker

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Reply with quote  #43 

The HPWH is new enough people are still sceptical about the ROI.  If you can get them for a net price of $450 like Chris J did the, risk to benefit ratio is a no brainer.

Rick H Parker

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Rick H Parker
Kansas, USA
Electronics Engineering Technologist
stmbtwle

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Reply with quote  #44 
Hm yes I forgot about the rebates... That would be a good deal.

Here in Florida where we use air conditioning most of the time, the HPWH would be a benefit, if the price was right.

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Willie, Tampa Bay
ChrisJ

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Reply with quote  #45 
Quick update: The Low-E glass is limiting the temp inside the collector. Only seeing 125*F so the water at the bottom of the storage tank has only gotten up to 110*F.

I have wondered if reflecting the sun onto the collector might help, like some do in the winter for there air panels.

The warming of the well water before it goes into the HPWH has kept it from running much.
 
ChrisJ

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Reply with quote  #46 
I am seeing some higher temps now that the sun is lower in the sky, at least I think that's why.

Collector temps around 150*F, Tank water temp highest is 128*F.

I have the tank also connected to the garage floor radiant tubing. The temp of 240 gallons(approx) of water drops fairly quickly when I run the circulator. The tank was 125* to start, ran the pump for 3 hrs and the temp dropped to 88*.

I have the mixing valve set to 88*-90*. I will probably lower that temp during winter as I am only trying to heat the garage to 55-60*.


Garage_Hermit

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Reply with quote  #47 
Chris-J said, "The Low-E glass is limiting the temp inside the collector."

Hiya, which way round did you install the glass ?
Counting from the outside, face 1, to the inside, face 4, then the coating needs to be on face 3.
You can test this using a zippo or a candle: you will see 4 reflexions, the coated face should show up a different color.

Hope it works !

best regards,

G-H


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(1)  "Heat goes from hot to cold, there is no directional bias"
(2) It's wrote, "voilà" unless talking musical instruments...
ChrisJ

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Reply with quote  #48 
They are exterior sliding glass doors, so they are used same as they would as a door.
Rick H Parker

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Reply with quote  #49 
They are exterior sliding glass doors, so they are used same as they would as a door.

How they where used as doors depends on the climate. Willie would want the coating on surface #2 to reduce cooling cost. Somebody way up north would want the coating on surface #3 to reduce heating cost. You want to retain heat in the collector, surface #3 would be the correct orientation for a solar thermal collector. If the coating is on surface #2, the performance of the collector will be diminished.

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Rick H Parker
Kansas, USA
Electronics Engineering Technologist
ChrisJ

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Reply with quote  #50 
I am in Rhode Island so colder climate. So hopefully I will have better cold weather performance.

I was a little disappointed in the summer performance.
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