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RevI

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Reply with quote  #1 
http://fisonicsolutions.com/technology.php
Can anybody explain the science behind this technology? What I can say that it's not liquid jet ejector as in a liquid jet ejector, the pressure of the liquid is higher and of the gaseous fluid is lower and the discharge is something in between i.e. a pressure level in between both.

trendawareness

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Reply with quote  #2 
In the earlier days of jet aviation, water injection was used to provide a temporary boost in the takeoff thrust in jet engines by increasing the mass flowing through the jet engine. (Whether the temporary boost was worth the increased weight and complexity is another debate.)  

From Fisonic's description, it sounds like they're using a similar principle to increase the effective thrust of a steam source. 

https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Water_injection_(engine)#/Use_in_aircraft



stmbtwle

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Reply with quote  #3 
What does it have to do with solar?

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Willie, Tampa Bay
RevI

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Reply with quote  #4 
In solar thermal power plants, it can be used to raise the pressure of the exhaust steam or preserving the latent heat of vaporisation of the exhaust steam. And, by the way, I have posed this in general discussion and chat page.
And I don't think the basic principle will be similar to injection of water into jet engines. In this technology, water is mixed with steam and its pressure rises to higher level. In case of jet engines, the pressure and temperature is already high enough and water injection can't raise the pressure to higher level.
stmbtwle

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Reply with quote  #5 
I'm not a steam engineer but I would think that injecting water into a steam line would COOL the steam and thus reduce the pressure. You might get more steam, but at lower pressure, and I think the total ENERGY would be the same or even less. Also, water droplets in the steam can erode the turbine blades.

It might work in a jet engine or even a recip, but I think a steam engine is a different breed of cat.

I don't see the point.

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Willie, Tampa Bay
RevI

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Reply with quote  #6 
Correct. This technology has no connection with injecting water into steam.
stmbtwle

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Reply with quote  #7 
So what's the point? And what does it have to do with solar?

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Willie, Tampa Bay
gbwillson

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Reply with quote  #8 
Willie-

I'm guilty of spinning a topic or two away from exclusively solar. Things like home insulation, wind power etc., while not solar, they are related. 

I remember experimenting years ago with introducing water vapor into a carbureted engine. The theory was that by introducing water vapor into the combustion chamber, it would give you several advantages.  First you would cool the explosion.  This would make the air inside the combustion chamber more dense. Second, the vapor would turn to steam from the explosion, and would increase the volume, which increased compression. And lastly, the introduction of the water vapor would allow the engine to run leaner than it otherwise would, saving gas. Oh, and I guess the steam helps clean the valves and cylinder heads too.

I putzed around with this a bit many years ago and it does work. But admittedly, it was my first car, which was a muscle car('71 Pontiac GT-37 455CuIn, 4-barrel Holly carb), so I wasn't concerned about saving gas at the time, only performance. My only testing was with a stopwatch, but I do recall noticing a 3-4MPG improvement in gas mileage, in addition to any performance improvements.

Greg in MN


stmbtwle

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Reply with quote  #9 
Yes it's been proven to work in internal combustion engines and there are lots of articles on it. It's been around since WWII and seems to have several benefits, more power, less pollution, better fuel economy. It's even been used in reciprocating steam engines though it adds a lot to the complexity. I can't find any articles about it being used in steam turbines, though if by adding water (mass) to the steam jet it just might increase power and efficiency as Revi suggests.

I stand corrected. My apologies Revi.

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Willie, Tampa Bay
RevI

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Reply with quote  #10 
I don't know whether it's my inability to make others understand the subject or something else, but I again want to repeat something. This is NOT by any means similar to injecting water inside an engine or something else. In that case, the water injection will lower both the temperature and pressure of the exhaust fluid. In this case, the pressure of the exhaust is higher than both the inputs. That's something totally different from injecting water into engine.
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