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SolarInterested

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Reply with quote  #1 
https://solarthermalmagazine.com/2017/11/16/worlds-largest-biopv-roof-installation-using-heliateks-heliasol/

Excerpt:

With 3 different lengths of 2, 4 and 5.7 meters, nearly 400 films were applied in record time. The result is the largest BiOPV – Building integrated Organic PhotoVoltaic – roof installation, worldwide to date, and proof of the ease and speed that these solar films can be installed.

Heliatek’s HeliaSol “ready-to-use” film was used on a roof installation for the first time. With a self-adhesive back and preconfigured wiring, HeliaSol is mounted directly onto existing roof surfaces and only needs to be electrically connected. Taking into account the preparation time, 6 people needed only 8 hours to install 500m² of HeliaSol as deployment took just over 2 minutes per film.  With an installed power of 22.5 kWp, about 23.8 MWh will be generated annually, representing approximately 15% of the school’s electricity demand.

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stmbtwle

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Interesting. Unisolar had an adhesive-backed PV sheet a few years ago, designed for metal roofs. Wasn't organic, though.

It will be interesting to see how the organic technology works out.

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SolarInterested

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Quote:
Originally Posted by stmbtwle
Interesting. Unisolar had an adhesive-backed PV sheet a few years ago, designed for metal roofs.
That was the aspect I found interesting. Any idea how successful the Unisolar PV sheets were?

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stmbtwle

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Reply with quote  #4 
They're still in business which says something! The flexible strips are aimed at the commercial market which may be why we haven't heard much, but the also make "solar shingles" for the residential market.

http://www.uni-solar.com/products/index.html

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SolarInterested

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Quote:
Originally Posted by stmbtwle
... they also make "solar shingles" for the residential market. http://www.uni-solar.com/products/index.html


"Meet PowerShingle. Solar that’s designed to fit you. Your style. Your home. Your roof. No bulky panels or heavy frames, just a solar roof that’s stylish enough for the front of your home, with the energy to power it."

I wonder about problems with all the connections required for 'shingles' and also the lack of air circulation under the panels causing degraded output due to higher panels temperatures. I guess if you can put more capicity on your roof for the same price the bottom line is better?

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Both temperature rise and airflow are integral to comparing hot air collectors
stmbtwle

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That's been my concern too. All that heat can't be good for the shingles OR the roof itself. But if you live in a cooler climate it might be an advantage. Another of my concerns is the lifespan of the PLASTIC (not glass) covering.

I'd definitely need more information.

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