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Garage_Hermit

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Reply with quote  #1 
Interesting site here...

http://www.aprovecho.net/2009/09/constructing-a-ferrocement-tank/

Some mates of mine built a 45-foot ferro ketch, years back, and it floated OK,
so no reason this tank should not work [rolleyes]

G_H

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solardan1959

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Reply with quote  #2 
They did not go into details much about the plastering of the walls , thickness, and finished product that I saw.  Not sure I would trust that much water so a couple of inches of plaster in a wire mesh.  I wonder if it is plaster, sounds more like a cement mix.  On a smaller scale maybe.... and definitely outside!

in the first post they for July 2014had this,
Quote:
Earthen floors are rapidly being recognized as a desirable, natural alternative to conventional floor systems. Not only do they capture heat (or cool) increasing the energy efficiency of your home, but they are pleasing to both the eye and the soles of your feet.
can't say I agree with their thinking that much, I much rather lay around on a piece of carpet than a dirt floor, probably a little less dusty too.

Dan
Garage_Hermit

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Reply with quote  #3 
Dan,

the walls & roof are 2.5 inches thick :

Rest assured, they are only using "plaster" as a generic term !
It's cement ok :
Quote:
a ratio of 1 part cement to 2.5 parts sand to 1/10th part lime. 


=====

If I remember right, my mates' boat hull was 1.5 inches thick.
Ferrocement is one heck of a resilient material - it BENDS !
All the strength comes from the close-mesh skeleton; the cement just forms a sealing membrane.

They go into a fair amount of detail where it's most required - particularly the cold joint at the bottom, and the strenghtening fillet, between wall and floor.

+ they also *DO* refer to two books, so I guess that all-in-all, this ought to be enough for a would-be builder to go on...

UPDATED for:
general reading HERE:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ferrocement

G_H


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gaiatechnician

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Reply with quote  #4 
Its a very strong mix.  I would guess that they are using fine masonry or stucco sand.   I have made a few small "rock wall ponds" as a stone mason over the years. Then they are parged with a propitiatory mix called zipex (or another additive  called antihydro can be added as a waterproofer to cement).  The propitiatory stuff is damn expensive! and God knows what is in it!   It is not very popular and nearly everyone does a rubber lining instead.  But a couple of years ago at our local green drinks an old guy told me that they used to just use cement mixed with clay as waterproofer. I tested it last year and it worked and I tested it a bit more accurately this year and it worked again and probably better so I will share most of the method below.  It is the "dirt cheap" option!  My brother has some very big  premade concrete water storage tanks on the farm back in Ireland.  Might be a competitive option for people in farming areas.    vlcsnap-2014-11-03-21h25m13s224.png    I don't know if they have rebar in them possibly not. Maybe some mesh   (Those would be standard concrete (made with a mix called navyjack here) with a lot less cement usage in the mix than in stucco mix). I made a rock wall planter/pond this year.  So it looks like a boat but it can be either a pond or a planter.  Jade wanted it as a planter, but she allowed me to test mixes to parge the inside.  (So it can be a pond if she changes her mind)  It is just a masonry rock wall with one rebar top and one bottom and linking vertical rebar every 3 ft.   I welded them  together.  Masonry rock walls are generally made here with a  mix 4 coarse sand to 1 cement and a pretty dry mix (no sump) so that you can stack the rock and build up.  This is fairly porous.  No waterholding capacity.  I parged with a mix of 1 shovel cement to 1 shovel fine sand (masonry sand for bricks) to 1 shovel clay from the ground and mixed it with a heavy duty stucco mixer attachment on the drill with water to a stiff putty and troweled it on thin  the inside of my pond.  So the pond is about 550 liters and that mix (a half full 5 gallon drywall) did the entire inside.  I was surprised that it did so much!  This was nearly waterproof. I filled it and let it leak out.    So next, I made something like  3 trowels clay to 3 trowels cement and painted that mix on. Again, it was a shock to use so little material.   This was nearly completely waterproof.  Definitely good enough for me. I left it about a week but was unable to do an accurate measurment of how much was leaking because it rained. I put in the drainage tap as an afterthought and around this was where most of the leakage was. Put in your drainage as you build the rock wall!   And then I converted it into a planter.   By the way, we have a rule here that a pond cannot be more than 18 inches deep.   Another point worth making is that the above ground tanks are frowned upon in India.   It is way way way to easy to empty them.   If your tank is in the ground,  they consider it to be a much better option. Easier to fill  harder to damage, does not need to be so super strong and much harder to empty by accident.  So, the waterproof planter is the one with the swiss chard in it at the back.  I was going to make it total boat shape but it is already 3 ft wide so as a planter, you need to be able to reach across so we only have the near side.   My wife might allow me to make a pond up on the left where the bricks are.   IMG_0004.JPG  Hopefully I will get it done in the winter.  Brian
GOM

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Reply with quote  #5 
GH, 

I don't know about where you live but here in my part of the US one can buy new and unused 500, 1000, and 2000 gallon septic tanks for a few hundred bucks.  They are concrete with about four inch walls, same for the top and bottom. They have to be strong because I've seen them swung off of trucks using cable slings and handled pretty roughly as they're set into pre dug holes for their usual use in household sewer systems.  

The tanks have an inlet at one end which is just under the top and a slightly lower outlet at the other end which is also surrounded internally by a cement partition to keep solid waste away from the outlet until it's liquified by bacterial action in the tank.  All in all, they're a neat piece of construction and they have to be water tight to meet local building codes here in NM.

I was an appliance repair and general handyman part-time when I lived in rural Arkansas and I've seen more than a few septic tanks there used for water storage both inside and outside of houses.  I saw a number of them that had also been lined with vinyl swimming pool liners and the water from them was used for drinking and all the usual household requirements.  

Just a thought and now you've got my rusty mental gears going since I'm about to have a 100' foot deep well put in behind my house for irrigation, and at the north end of a 3.5 acre plot I own just behind the house. That 3.5 acres is about to become fruit. Xmas, and firewood trees which I plan to drip irrigate, hence the need for another well.  I plan to use a DC submersible pump powered by solar for the trees.  My rainfall here in western NM averages 8 to 10 inches annually so very little but native weeds and scrub brush grows naturally without irrigation.  Anyway, a septic tank would fit right in with my plans. Thanks for the mental jog.   GOM     

 


stmbtwle

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Reply with quote  #6 
Very interesting. If I were to build a solar tank how would I insulate it?
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Garage_Hermit

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Reply with quote  #7 
Hi, GOM,

I'm in northern France, it's part of Old Europe [redface].

They sell these things round here...
[48481]
This one is 3000-liter capacity, or approx. 775 USG,
priced at 469 Euros = around 510 USD.

shipping one to you might be a problem, I guess [rolleyes]

G_H



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(1)  "Heat goes from hot to cold, there is no directional bias"
(2) It's wrote, "voilà" unless talking musical instruments...
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