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GOM

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Posts: 72
Reply with quote  #1 
A few days ago, two stray dogs were fighting in my new apple orchard.  One of them, or both, knocked over and broke a beautiful two year old apple tree off at the ground.  My daughter and I were sick about the destroyed tree so I decided to try and save it or at least clone it.  

I've been viewing youtube videos on propagating fruit trees by various methods so I tried three different methods.  
1.  I cut about ten inch long sections of approximately pencil thick lengths of limbs from the tree. These were dipped in a rooting hormone solution and put into two transparent plastic bottles with about two inches of water in each bottle and then the caps screwed on.  These are supposed to start to sprout buds, leaves, and roots in about three weeks.  
2.  I placed four more shorter limbs with all but two leaves stripped off into holes drilled in potatoes, then buried the potatoes in a container filled with about ten inches of top soil with the leaf end of the branches just sticking out.  
3.  I stripped all but a few leaves from the original small tree which has a trunk a bit more than an inch in diameter, dipped its base in the hormone rooting mixture and planted it deep in about ten inches of top soil.  

The 'bottled' limbs only require loosening the bottle tops once a day to let in some fresh air, and also a daily watch for any mold in the water.  The other two plantings are kept in the shade and covered with white plastic trash bags which are removed for a short time daily.  I've never tried any of these methods before so we shall see what we shall see.  If anyone is interested, I'll keep you posted as to results.  I do want to save or clone that lovely little tree.  Regards, GOM  

Gordy

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Posts: 137
Reply with quote  #2 
GOM,

How are the tree's doing? I frequently have trimmings from apple and cherry tree's, I would like to try this if you have any luck ;-) One issue for me is in MN some fruit trees have the disirable tops grafted to root stock that can survive our winters, so the clones may not survive the first winter :-(

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Gordy,
Minnesota
GOM

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Posts: 72
Reply with quote  #3 
Gordy,  I believe I'm going to have some luck with the cuttings, about 15, I put in two Canadian Mist whiskey bottles.  Half or more of them are showing tiny green nubs forming along their lengths and a couple look like they,re trying to sprout leaves at the tops.  The four in potatoes and soil are not doing much.  I do spritz them with water several times daily, otherwise it's a waiting game.  The original broken off tree is still maintaining some green leaves at its top so I'm hopeful for it also.  

A few days ago, I took about 20 six inch long cuttings from a heavy bearing quince tree right outside my back door.  These cuttings are now in two peanut butter jars. This tree is about 75 years old and has turned into its own thicket.  It's about 15 or so feet high and easily 15 feet in diameter with all its limbs., It's loaded down with fruit this year and I would love to propagate it. When the original Spanish settlers came into this area 300 or so years ago, the only good source of vitamin C they brought with them from Spain was quince trees.  They taste rather strong and a bit bitter to me until cooked but then they become quite sweet and tasty.  There are a number of recipes for quince jellies and jams on the web.  I don't really know but I suspect the Spanish mariners, like the English (the Limeys) also discovered a long time ago that fruits like lemons, limes, quince, etc., would keep sailors healthy on long sea voyages.  I guess the Brits got citrus fruits from Asia while the Spanish began cultivating quince and later, various citrus trees.  One local storekeeper has offered me one dollar each for quince if I have a good crop this year.  At that rate my one lonesome tree will 'kick out' 500 or 600 dollars worth this fall. I would love to add 20 or 30 quince trees to my orchard, just for ornamentation if nothing else.  .          

Gordy

Registered:
Posts: 137
Reply with quote  #4 
GOM,

I'm back online, and wonder how the tree's are doing? The quince tree's sound interesting, had to google them and found out it gets too cold here for them.

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Gordy,
Minnesota
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