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stmbtwle

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Reply with quote  #11 
Ok that's about what I thought.  The can heats the air, it rises, and flows back down along the copper pipe heating it. You have an internal thermosiphon going there.  Probably the longer can stack in a larger collector would generate a stronger siphon.  I think locating the copper pipe toward the back of the can stack might help, separating to some extent the hot and cool sides of the siphon.   

I think most of the folks on here who work with tube collectors have gone to aluminum downspouts.  Not free, but a whole lot less work.  

Considering the amount of work that goes into a tube grid AND a can stack, I can certainly understand the reflector.  It might be easier if you located your can stacks a diameter apart, and put inverted "V" reflectors between them in addition to at the sides.  I don't know if it would be more efficient but it should be less work to build.  Just a thought.

I think it qualifies as an ARETHA... what say, guys?





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Willie, Tampa Bay

Onoff

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Reply with quote  #12 
Next build will use 440ml beer cans so less work and less joints than the soda cans. I've been pretty disciplined whilst amassing my cans tbh. As I finish one I immediately take the top out with a P-38 can opener (thanks America! [smile] ). It's a breeze for taking the tops out. Taking the tops out with a hole saw is far more hazardous than the bottoms which have more of a depression to keep the hole saw in place.

Not all my own work, my two nephews have assisted in "emptying" them! Got so many I'm now back to putting them in the recycling sack.
stmbtwle

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Reply with quote  #13 
Glad you have help. Emptying all those cans is a lot of work! [smile]

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Willie, Tampa Bay
Rick H Parker

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Reply with quote  #14 
"I think it qualifies as an ARETHA... what say, guys?"

ARETHA (AiR Exchange THermal Assembly) is a sustainable device to produce hot water from the sun, made with low cost materials and without any particular expertise.

The requirements are
1. Must be a Heat Exchanger.
2. One of the fluid must be air and the other water.
2. Must be build from low cost materials.
3. Must not require any particular expertise.

It is an Heat Exchanger.
The working fluids are air and water.
The only way one could get the material cost lower then free scrap is if somebody paid you to take it.
Construction does not require any particular expertise.

It qualifies.

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Rick H Parker
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stmbtwle

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Reply with quote  #15 
I don't remember those "rules" in the original concept, but it certainly fits.

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Willie, Tampa Bay
Onoff

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Reply with quote  #16 
This is the stack of old greenhouse glass I have. In order to cover a nom 8'x4' panel front I'm going to have to introduce extra support ribs. It'll end up looking a touch Georgian I think:

Onoff

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Reply with quote  #17 
Out of interest I was wondering at the cost of materials in the States?

£21.49 (US $27.48) for a single 8'x4' sheet of 1" poly iso foil faced both sides.

£25.49 (US $32.59) for a single 8'x4' sheet of 1/2" non structural hardwood plywood.

That's for a one off from a major DIY chain in the UK.
stmbtwle

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Reply with quote  #18 
"Georgian" might look pretty good, depending on your home style.
Those prices look pretty comparable.

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Willie, Tampa Bay
Onoff

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Reply with quote  #19 
The house is a bit of a nothing style wise. This is the SW facing elevation. Ideal for something up on that hip end:


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gbwillson

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Reply with quote  #20 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Onoff
Out of interest I was wondering at the cost of materials in the States? £21.49 (US $27.48) for a single 8'x4' sheet of 1" poly iso foil faced both sides. £25.49 (US $32.59) for a single 8'x4' sheet of 1/2" non structural hardwood plywood. That's for a one off from a major DIY chain in the UK.


Around here,

You can get a 4x8 sheet of 1" foil-faced polyiso for about $13
And expect to pay roughly $20 for a cheap 4x8 sheet of ½" plywood. But the price can more than triple, depending on the quality.

Greg in MN



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