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Rick Stone

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Posts: 121
Reply with quote  #31 
Shawn,
   Welcome, glad you are here. You have a lot to learn, and there are many knowledgeable people that are very generous with their skills and sharing their experiences on this site.
There are no real plans or kits available for the solar heaters that people build here. They are built to fit the needs, skills and finances of each individual. This site is a wealth of information and concepts that we all draw from to some extent.
   The first thing you need to do is read, read, and read some more. Get familiar with types of solar heaters so that you can decide what type of heater suits your needs. To save yourself money and time do a lot of research and ask a lot of questions before starting.
   To answer your question "What is a snap disc" Enclosed is a photo and here is a link

http://ecomfort.com/3f01-110-snap-disc-fan-controls-110-f-cut-in-90-f-cut-out-350-f-max-ambient-33147.html    

  This is a common type of snap disc that is used. It is an automatic heat sensitive electrical switch that is used to turn on and off your solar heater fan. It is a non adjustable thermostat of sorts, at 110 degrees F it closes and makes electrical contact and allows power to go to your fan. It is placed inside of the heater in the air flow path of the heater outlet. When the temperature of the air flow drops to 90 degrees F the switch breaks electrical contact and the fan stops. This process is repeated as the heater's internal temp reaches 110 F.

Rick
Talmo, Ga                               Where are you located?

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rosweed

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Reply with quote  #32 
Hi Rick,

Thanks for the explanation. I appreciate it. I was hoping that Scott had a set of plans somewhere that I could work from because the unit he made would be perfect for my house. I guess I can trial and error it from the video.

I live in Colorado Springs, CO.

Shawn
gbwillson

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Posts: 2,071
Reply with quote  #33 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rosweed
Hi Rick,

Thanks for the explanation. I appreciate it. I was hoping that Scott had a set of plans somewhere that I could work from because the unit he made would be perfect for my house. I guess I can trial and error it from the video.

I live in Colorado Springs, CO.

Shawn


Hi Shawn-

There are lots of ideas, trials and errors that go in to building any collector, especially your first one. Keep asking questions! The questions you ask have most likely been asked, and answered, before. So take lots of pics to update us on your progress. 

Greg in MN[wave]
Rick Stone

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Posts: 121
Reply with quote  #34 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rosweed
Hi Rick,

Thanks for the explanation. I appreciate it. I was hoping that Scott had a set of plans somewhere that I could work from because the unit he made would be perfect for my house. I guess I can trial and error it from the video.

I live in Colorado Springs, CO.

Shawn


Shawn,
     Before you are going to make a project similar to what someone else has built always pick their brains first. Ask them what changes or improvements  they would make to the project. Asking questions and planning out your every detail to you project will save you money and headaches. Take it slow and do it right. There are no dumb questions, just answers that you don't have yet.

Rick
Talmo, GA.
netttech

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Posts: 720
Reply with quote  #35 
I agree, Schawn....ask the person directly.

I have always responded to direct emails on questions. I also believe the vast majority of memeber will also respond.

If someone has made a panel you believe would work for you, ask, because we generally find faults or improvements 'after' it was built-installed. I know I have & it's a continual process.

Speaking for myself & I think the other members, we ALL want people to be successful with their venture into Solar Thermal.

Experience, speaks volumes in this field.....ask away, because we are willing to share.

Jeff
Central IL

dthorn

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Posts: 1
Reply with quote  #36 
Hi all.

I'm new to this forum as well, and I hope I'm posting this question in the right place.

I'm considering building a form of the downspout collector using thin wall aluminum pipe that I have access to.  The pipe wall is 3/32" thick, and I'm planning on making an intake and output plenum using aluminum box tubing.

Is this overkill, or will there be some longevity benefits to the sturdier construction.  I live in an area that usually gets to -30 C for a couple of weeks in the winter, and as we heat with wood I'm looking for a way to augment our heating in between fires, and when no one is around to tend the fire.

I've just begun to gather knowledge on this subject, so feel free to point me in the right direction.

Dan T.
Barriere, BC
cwwilson721

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Posts: 303
Reply with quote  #37 
Out of curiosity, would adding angled fins to the downspout help the heat gain?

Something like this:

Finned DS.jpg    
The red lines are the added fins. Note, I put them 'low' so as much of the DS tube would still get sunlight and get warmed that way, while still having a use for the fins.

Was just trying to think of a way to use the "wasted" space between the DS tubes.

gbwillson

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Posts: 2,071
Reply with quote  #38 
CW-

I like the idea. There have been several discussions regarding the spacing between tube-type collectors. If loosely spaced, they are more effective with morning and late sun angles. Looser spacing also means less tubes to buy or assemble. But I don't recall anyone addressing reflectors between the tubes themselves. Leaving the foil exposed on the back insulation would take care of a lot of that, but not so much when the sun is directly overhead, when loose spacing is least efficient. I suppose a lot would depend on the spacing of the tubes which would determine the angle of the reflectors. Looking at your drawing above, I would suggest moving the reflectors all the way to the back wall. As it is above, the reflectors would block the sun from hitting the bottom side of the collector. What were you thinking for the reflectors? How about a simple piece of angle trim with reflective mylar glued to it?

Greg in MN[thumb]
solardan1959

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Posts: 1,845
Reply with quote  #39 
Greg,
   I just thought of a new idea when you mentioned angle trim, how about a ^ with mylar on it?  That way it does not block light when it's at an angle but reflects it to the downspout closer to noon and prevents it from bouncing right back to the glazing.

Dan
gbwillson

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Posts: 2,071
Reply with quote  #40 
DAN-

That's what I was implying. I suppose it could be almost anything with an angle with mylar attached. Aluminum angle trim of flashing would be good since the weight would be light. White or mill finish would work, but I like the mylar better.

Greg
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