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pftg41

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Posts: 11
Reply with quote  #1 
Hi guys just a quick question what about plastic totes for a storage tank with insulation of course

wonder if these would be able to handle the heat very cheap to buy


thanks  

Dave

did use forum search came up with nothing so thought i'd post

SolarInterested

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Spam Stomper
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Reply with quote  #2 
Hi Dave. I had this bookmarked from a Yahoo group post:

http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/SimplySolar/message/29610?o=1&d=-1

"Hi Gary,
I have used tote tanks (275 gal pallet tanks) for vegetable oil, which are the same plastic that all the milky plastic tanks are made of, to 160F and they seem to last ok but I wouldn't recommend it either. I have had one fail but not sure why as I couldn't locate the leak point. I think they are rated to 140F is all, and with a solar application the temps could go to 180F as you know. "

but then there are projects that have used them like:

http://www.builditsolar.com/Projects/Sunspace/GreenhouseHX/GreenhouseHX.htm

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mattie

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Reply with quote  #3 
Hello all
Ive came across that post before and makes for some interesting reading.
If high temps and leaks were a factor then perhaps and epdm liner could be used inside the IBC with the bars and tank plastic providing support.
A tray could be constructed from marine ply with epdm or polythene(cheaper) used underneath the IBC to provide leak protection .A gully and runoff pipe could be used to ensure it does not overflow.
Regards Mattie
Ky-Jeeper

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Reply with quote  #4 
The cage is the diamond. Line it with plywood and epdm and it will be a very nice and sturty tank.
pftg41

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Reply with quote  #5 
thanks for the input guys back to drawing board lol
cwwilson721

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Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ky-Jeeper
The cage is the diamond. Line it with plywood and epdm and it will be a very nice and sturty tank.
Actually, an AWESOME idea. Would be a lot lighter, and stronger, than a comparatively sized 'typical' 2 x 4 framed tank. No chance of "blowout", either.

Never thought of it, just using the 'cage'...Hmm...

 
mattie

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Reply with quote  #7 
Hello all
Something else that crossed my mind today, is it may be possible to join cages  to make a larger tank.
Simply cut off one side of the cage and use a metal rod or smaller diameter bar (maybe rebar?)that would slide into the gap left on the frame when cut.
Cut the opposite side of the other cage and join them (slide metal bar into hole left in cage again) this will provide strength and make a 550 gallon tank . Wrap thick wire or use bolts and fittings etc to hold it all together and then marine ply sheets and pond liner inside. Can add more volume(cages) too if needed.

It may also be possible to stack them on top of each other and make a tall tank , cut the bottom out of the ones off the ground and repeat ply and liner method.
Regards Mattie
Gray Edwards

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Posts: 13
Reply with quote  #8 

This seems to be an excellent idea.  They are made of HDPE which should withstand temperatures of 180F on an ongoing basis.  Not sure why it leaked in the one scenario.  But the liner suggestion is an excellent layer of redundancy - always a good thing.

Mattie - if you are talking about using just the cage and building an inner tank, make sure you reinforce the lower portion if you stack them.  Remember, the pressure exerted by the water is the height of water times the density.  Thus, 7.5' (they are 45", or 3.75', tall each) times 62.4 lb/cf = 468 psf...at the bottom of the tank.  The overall force on the long side face (48" wide) = 468/2 x 7.5 x 4' = 7,020 lbs!

mattie

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Reply with quote  #9 
Hello Gray Edwards.
Very good point! Any ideas how the reinforcement could be done?
Regards Mattie
Garage_Hermit

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Reply with quote  #10 
FWIW, maybe U could just build the tank inside the steel tote-container frame, using, say, 30mm XPS sheet, which is apparently impervious to water: http://www.google.fr/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=6&ved=0CEkQFjAF&url=http%3A%2F%2Finsulation.owenscorning.com%2FWorkArea%2FDownloadAsset.aspx%3Fid%3D898&ei=aUzaU8ayNPSX0QW3kICgAg&usg=AFQjCNE16Q4oezJFV2zxsh02dDR6CtoEuw&sig2=9WsiZTMzYCIZdf4rdBhYuA&bvm=bv.72185853,d.d2k


At about 5000 lbs per sq.foot (safe 50-yr limit), the compressive strength of XPS looks like many times more than enough to meet the above calculation of 7000 lbs/sq.ft for the long side.

You might be able to get away with using a liner, by reinforcing the joins with internally cemented PVC angles (in the corners) or cover strips (on butt joints).



G_H

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